Document


Title

A summary of prescribed burning and smoke management activities in Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina
Document Type: Conference Paper
Author(s): H. J. Green
Compiler(s): D. D. Wade
Publication Year: 1985

Cataloging Information

Keyword(s):
fire hazard reduction; fire management; fire size; forest management; North Carolina; pollution; smoke effects; smoke management; South Carolina; Virginia
Region(s):
Record Maintained By:
Record Last Modified: August 6, 2018
FRAMES Record Number: 48969
Tall Timbers Record Number: 25228
TTRS Location Status: In-file
TTRS Call Number: A13.32/2: W32
TTRS Abstract Status: Fair use, Okay, Reproduced by permission

This bibliographic record was either created or modified by the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy and is provided without charge to promote research and education in Fire Ecology. The E.V. Komarek Fire Ecology Database is the intellectual property of the Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

Description

From the text ... 'Prescribed fire is an important forestry tool in the states of Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina. It is used primarily for hazard reduction, site preparation and other types of silvicultural purposes. Burning in all three states is done under permit with the state forestry agency, and all three states make use of a voluntary Smoke Management Plan. The Smoke Management Plan links the state agency responsible for air pollution control very closely with the state forestry agency. Forestry burning is generally exempt from control under the air pollution control agency, unless an extreme air stagnation condition develops -- in that case all outside burning is usually forbidden.'

Citation:
Green, H. J. 1985. A summary of prescribed burning and smoke management activities in Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina, in Wade, D. D., Prescribed fire and smoke management in the south: conference proceedings. Atlanta, GA. USDA Forest Service, Southeastern Forest Experiment Station,Asheville, NC. p. 19-21,