Current Announcements and Jobs

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Displaying 1 - 29 of 29


Job: Forester - Silviculture - Payette National Forest (posted Oct 13, 2019)

Responsibilities:

  • Incumbent must be a certified Silviculturist upon placement in this position OR attain certification within three years of that date.
  • Assist in the development of long-range vegetation management plans and programs, including formulation of policies, objectives, and priorities, and the correlation and integration of timber plans into the overall land management plans.
  • Serve as a consultant and advisor to line and staff officers and to district/SO personnel in all facets of reforestation and timber stand improvement techniques and their effect on other resource activities.
  • Review all compartment prescriptions for technical adequacy and compliance with policies and standards.
  • Provide program leadership for the silviculture program on the forest to draft local policy and technical guides and standards for timber marking, reforestation, and timber stand improvement programs.
  • Lead, oversee, and/or conduct project level NEPA in order to facilitate implementation of specific projects.
  • Serve as the Forest budget coordinator for the silviculture program which includes coordinating with Regional staff on budget allocations and making adjustments to ensure the Forest silviculture program budget remains within its annual allocations.
  • Monitor expenditures across the Forest to keep the Forest Leadership Team informed of the status of the silviculture program and budget.
  • Prepare plans and technical specification for field projects designed to collect and analyze data related to timber stand classification, volume, and growth.
  • Provide prescriptions and prescription certification and oversight for vegetation treatment projects, including stand thinning, timber harvest, and prescribed application of fire.
  • Provide Forest-wide coordination advice and program direction in the development of prescriptions for treatment of vegetation.

Deadline: Oct 22, 2019
Location: Payette National Forest
Address: McCall, ID

Job: Southern Blue Ridge Prescribed Fire Specialist - TNC - Asheville, NC (posted Oct 11, 2019)

The Prescribed Fire Specialist may be asked to serve a leadership role on prescribed burns throughout Southern Blue Ridge from November 13, 2019 through May 13, 2019. The Conservancy supports Southern Blue Ridge Fire Learning Network partners on multiple controlled burns each year. The Prescribed Fire Specialist helps the stewardship manager write burn plans, design burn units, ArcGIS mapping, and lead burns for single or multi-day prescribed fire operations and routinely has supervisory responsibility of crew during burns and frequently serves as Firing Boss. Staffing needs for this position could average 40-50 hours per operational period (bi-weekly) at the discretion of the Stewardship Manager. Operational periods are generally sporadic and clustered by opportune weather conditions, and no guarantee of a minimum number of opportunities is given or implied. The Prescribed Fire Specialist will participate on opportunities only as their own schedules will allow, and thus participation on any given opportunity is not required.


Deadline: Nov 7, 2019

Job: Forest Health Fire Ecologist - Washington DNR (posted Oct 10, 2019)

As Forest Health Fire Ecologist you will be on the leading edge of a developing prescribed fire program improving forest health and resiliency throughout the state. You will be collecting fuels and fire effects data that will help guide prescribed fire implementation and planning efforts as the Washington Department of Natural Resources work towards its 20 year Forest Health Plan goals.


Location: Washington Department of Natural Resources
Address: 1111 Washington St. SE, Olympia, WA 98504
Contact Name: Michael Norris
Contact E-mail: michael.norris@dnr.wa.gov

Job: Forest Environmental Planner - Quinault Indian Nation - Taholah, WA (posted Oct 5, 2019)

General Description:

The Quinault Indian Reservation (QIR), located on Washington State’s scenic Olympic Peninsula, includes approximately 160k acres of timberland producing 47 million board feet annually.  The Quinault Division of Natural Resources is seeking an experienced professional individual to conduct harvest and environmental management planning activities for all Reservation trust forest lands.

Primary Functions:

  • The Forest Environmental Planner is responsible for full and proper implementation of the Quinault Indian Reservation Forest Management Plan (FMP).
    • Facilitating the Interdisciplinary Team process
    • Managing the submittal of ESA required documents to the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Project Consistency Forms (PCF) to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
    • Maintaining the PCF database and tracking all ESA documents
    • Assisting the Inventory and Harvest section with timber sale scheduling and completing all annual reporting requirements related to the FMP.
  • Duties also include managing the FMP update process every ten years including coordinating the required environmental/NEPA process and the ESA Section 7 consultation process.
  • Coordinating, updating and writing the Forest History Report and the Forest Practice Regulations.


Job: Wisconsin Fire Manager - TNC - Madison, WI (posted Oct 4, 2019)

The Fire Manager (FM) provides overall fire management supervision and coordination of Wisconsin’s fire program. The FM will be responsible for advancing the use of fire as a management tool on Conservancy and partner lands across high priority resilient landscapes in the state.  The FM will be responsible for contributing to Conservancy-wide training efforts including teaching NWCG courses & Prescribed Fire Training Exchanges and is expected to serve as a mentor to aspiring burn practitioners both within and outside the NWCG system. The FM will be expected to provide burn leadership expertise both in Wisconsin and out of state as opportunity presents. Anticipated travel for this position is 30%. Flexibility to participate in fire suppression opportunities is possible based on interest. The FM will also contribute to general land management efforts, such as timber management, forest restoration, wetland and stream restoration, and preserve maintenance, on Conservancy and partner lands as needed. The salary range starts at $58,000 and is dependent on experience.


Deadline: Nov 4, 2019

Job: Fire Lieutenant (2 vacancies) - East Bay Regional Park District Fire Department - Orinda, CA (posted Oct 4, 2019)

Looking for a rewarding career as a Fire Lieutenant? Consider a career in fire service with the East Bay Regional Park District Fire Department, specializing in wildland firefighting and hands-on fuels reduction. The Fire Department is a branch of the Public Safety Division and provides all typical emergency services, including fire suppression, hazardous materials responses, search and rescue, auto extrication, emergency medical services, prescribed burns for fire hazard reduction and resource management. The department has 14 wildland fire engines to provide service for 73 parks and responds to approximately 1,200 calls per year. The Fire Department works closely with our neighboring agencies in Alameda and Contra Costa counties and provides emergency response when called upon by CAL FIRE and the Office of Emergency Services.

Vacancy Situation: The Park District currently has two (2) Fire Lieutenant vacancies located at Fire Station #1 (Orinda, CA). The hiring pools established as a result of this recruitment will be used to fill the current vacancies and additional vacancies that may occur during the one year life of the hiring pools.

Applications accepted online only (see link below).

Application Deadline: 5:00pm Friday October 18, 2019


Deadline: Oct 18, 2019
Address: Orinda, CA
Contact Name: Jamie LeBow
Contact E-mail: jllebow@ebparks.org

General: Community Planning Assistance for Wildfire Applications (posted Oct 3, 2019)

CPAW works with communities to reduce wildfire risk through improved land use planning. Selected communities receive free, customized technical consulting services and training over the course of one year from CPAW’s team of professional land use planners, foresters, risk analysts, and researchers. Specific services may include detailed land use planning recommendations, hazard assessments, custom research, and training. Read more about what we do and the communities we’ve worked with to date.

CPAW assistance is voluntary and provided at the request of the local government. Local jurisdictions retain sole authority for implementation of land use planning recommendations provided through CPAW. CPAW services are provided at no cost to the community.

Applicant Eligibility:

Any community in the United States can apply. Eligible jurisdictions include towns, cities, tribal communities, and counties with authority over local land use and zoning decisions. (Unincorporated communities require county application.) Only applications demonstrating support from both the community’s planning and fire departments will be considered. Communities should be willing to commit staff time and sign a Memorandum of Understanding, but communities are not responsible for any direct costs associated with CPAW.


Deadline: Oct 18, 2019

General: IAFC Nominations for 2020 Wildfire Mitigation Awards (posted Oct 3, 2019)

The International Association of Fire Chiefs, National Association of State Foresters, National Fire Protection Association, and USDA Forest Service are now accepting nominations for the 2020 Wildfire Mitigation Awards.    
 
The Wildfire Mitigation Awards (WMA) are the highest national honor one can receive for outstanding work and significant program impact in wildfire preparedness and mitigation.  The three award categories are:

  •     National Wildfire Mitigation Award
  •     National Mitigation Hero Award
  •     Wildfire Mitigation Legacy Award

These awards are designed to recognize outstanding service in wildfire preparedness and safety across a broad spectrum of activities and among a variety of individuals and organizations. By honoring these achievements, the award sponsors also seek to increase public recognition and awareness of the value of wildfire mitigation efforts.


Deadline: Nov 15, 2019
Contact Name: Meghan Marklewitz
Contact E-mail: Meghan@iafc.org

Training: NAFRI and NWCG Courses (posted Oct 3, 2019)

NAFRI partners with the National Wildfire Coordinating Group (NWCG) and Course Development Sub Committees, comprised of subject matter experts, to manage and deliver graduate school level curriculums.  A total of 17 courses are supported by NAFRI staff and are delivered on an annual, biannual and biennial basis.



General: IAWF 2020 Award Nominations (posted Oct 1, 2019)

We encourage you to  gather your information to nominate some very deserving folks for these prestigious awards! The recipient does not need to be an IAWF member to receive an award. Awards will be announce and/or presented at one of our upcoming IAWF Conferences in 2020.

If you’ve nominated someone in the past and they were not selected as the recipient, please do not hesitate to re-nominate them. At times we have numerous deserving folks, however, at this time we are only able to select one person per award.


Deadline: Dec 2, 2019

Job: Restoration Associate - TNC - Tecumseh, MI (posted Sep 30, 2019)

The Restoration Associate Crew Member helps maintain preserves in areas that are remote and off limits to the public or preserves that are frequented by the visiting public and performs land management activities.  S/he manages natural resources, removes invasive/exotic species using mechanical and/or chemical methods, and conducts species monitoring.  S/he may assist in prescribed burns and operate/maintain tools and equipment. S/he will use GPS and geographic information systems (GIS) to identify, record and map non-native, invasive species. The applicant will use and maintain equipment, power tools, vehicles, trailers and GPS units. The successful applicant will be able to navigate natural areas with map and compass.  The Restoration Associate crew member will maintain preserve records using a database on a Windows PC.


Deadline: Oct 27, 2019

Job: Burn Crew Member - TNC - Lexington, KY (posted Sep 30, 2019)

The Kentucky fire management program is a seeking highly motivated, dedicated, hard-working individuals as Burn Crew Members (BCM) for our spring 2020 prescribed fire teams. BCMs will join other wildland fire management personnel working primarily in Kentucky and Tennessee towards implementing prescribed burning and other land management practices in concert with federal and state partners. These positions located in Southeast Kentucky will require much travel during the employment term of up to 90 days. Typical date ranges are early February through mid-April.


Deadline: Oct 25, 2019

Job: Burn Crew Manager - TNC - Lexington, KY (posted Sep 30, 2019)

The Nature Conservancy’s Kentucky Business Unit is seeking a full-time/seasonal Burn Crew Manager for the upcoming spring 2020 burn season.  This position will begin late January and end in April unless other arrangements are agreed upon. The Burn Crew Manager oversees a squad (4-8 Burn Crew Members) in wildland fire activities, as directed by the Kentucky Fire Manager, Burn Boss or other command position. This position will spend most of the time in SE Kentucky with frequent overnight travel. Lodging is provided.


Deadline: Oct 25, 2019

Job: TNC Interagency Burn Crew Technician - Mt. Pleasant, SC (posted Sep 30, 2019)

The U.S. Forest Service-TNC Interagency Burn Crew consists of three Crew Technicians and one Crew Supervisor. The crew will focus on fire-related activities, including prescribed fire implementation, in and around the Francis Marion and Sumter National Forests.  When not committed to the Francis Marion and Sumter National Forests, the crew will work with The Nature Conservancy and other partner agencies in South Carolina.  The work schedule is weather dependent and may be highly irregular at times.  Routine management activities such as fencing, boundary posting, removal of invasive species, forest management, ecological monitoring and other related stewardship activities may be performed during periods when the weather is unsuitable to conduct burns.


Deadline: Oct 26, 2019

Job: TNC Interagency Burn Crew Manager - Mount Pleasant, SC (posted Sep 30, 2019)

The U.S. Forest Service-TNC Interagency Burn Crew Manager serves as a part of a seasonal crew of four. The crew will focus on fire-related activities, including prescribed fire implementation, in and around the Francis Marion and Sumter National Forests.  When not committed to the Francis Marion and Sumter National Forests, the crew will work with The Nature Conservancy and other partner agencies in South Carolina.  The Crew Manager is responsible for leading the crew during non-fire activities including fire line preparation, staging, transportation, and equipment maintenance.  The work schedule is weather dependent and may be highly irregular at times.  Routine management activities such as fencing, boundary posting, removal of invasive species, forest management, ecological monitoring and other related stewardship activities may be performed during periods when the weather is unsuitable to conduct burns.  The Conservancy provides the crew members with vehicles and lodging.  Lodging includes hotels, rustic lodges and often camping.


Deadline: Oct 25, 2019

Job: CFL Fire Management Crew Manager - TNC - Box Spring, GA (posted Sep 30, 2019)

The Chattahoochee Fall Line (CFL) Fire Management Crew Manager oversees a squad (3-8 Fire Management Technicians) in wild land fire operations which include ignition, control, mop-up, suppression, monitoring, and other tasks as assigned focused on the ecological management and restoration of habitat for rare fire adapted species such as red-cockaded woodpecker, gopher tortoise, and carnivorous pitcherplants.


Deadline: Oct 31, 2019

Job: CFL Fire Management Crew Technician - TNC - Box Spring, GA (posted Sep 30, 2019)

The Chattahoochee Fall Line Burn Fire Management Technician (CFL-FMT) participates in wild land fire operations which include ignition, control, mop-up, suppression, monitoring, and other tasks as assigned focused on the ecological management and restoration of habitat for rare fire adapted species such as red-cockaded woodpecker, gopher tortoise, and carnivorous pitcherplants.


Deadline: Oct 31, 2019

Funding: JFSP Funding Opportunity Announcements (posted Sep 30, 2019)

The Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) are open through 5 pm MST, December 5, 2019.

The Graduate Research Innovation (GRIN) announcement FA-FOA0020-001 has one task statement. Proposals must address one or more of the following topic areas:

  • Fuels management and fire behavior
  • Changing fire environment
  • Emissions and air quality
  • Fire effects and post-fire recovery
  • Relative impacts of prescribed fire versus wildfire
  • Human dimensions of fire

The primary announcement FA-FOA0020-002 has one task statement:

  1. Performance of fuel breaks and fuel break systems  

The Regional Fire Science Exchange announcement FA-FOA0020-003 has one task statement focused on leading and executing a regional fire science exchange in the following four regions (see map and supporting information in the FOA):

  1. Alaska
  2. California
  3. Great Basin
  4. Pacific Islands

Deadline: Dec 5, 2019

Job: Fire Scientist - Washington DNR - Olympia, WA (posted Sep 25, 2019)

The Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Forest Health and Resiliency Division is hiring a Fire Scientist position. This Fire Scientist position will serve as the agency’s fire science lead responsible for conducting scientific analysis and research in support of the 20-Year Forest Health Strategic Plan, 10-Year Wildland Fire Protection Strategic Plan, the Forest Action Plan,  and other related plans and initiatives. This position will lead and integrate fire risk analysis and community wildfire risk reduction with landscape restoration planning. This position will serve as the agency expert in fire science independently performing original scientific research and analysis with publication of research findings in refereed publications. The successful candidate will work collaboratively with DNR scientists, US Forest Service researchers, university researchers and other partners.


Deadline: Oct 23, 2019
Contact Name: Chuck Hersey
Contact E-mail: chuck.hersey@dnr.wa.gov
Contact Phone: 360-902-1045

General: IAWF Statement Regarding Climate Change Week at the United Nations, September 23 – 29, 2019 (posted Sep 24, 2019)

Text of the International Association of Wildland Fire (IAWF) statement:

Climate change has already had significant consequences in the global wildfire reality, affecting citizens as well as the global wildland fire community. Many key issues of importance to the IAWF - including firefighter and civilian safety, fire management expenses, changing weather patterns, natural role of fire, fire regimes and ecosystem succession, as well as the wildland urban interface - all require recognition of the role of climate change.

Globally, we regularly see new reports about the “worst”, “largest”, “most expensive”, and “deadliest” fires and fire seasons. In 2019 and 2018, striking headlines read “Arctic on Fire” (Sweden, Russia, Greenland, Canada and Alaska), and the most expensive and largest fire years were recorded in 2018 in California and British Columbia, respectively, breaking the previous records set in 2017. The Camp Fire (CA, 2018), Attica Greece (2018), Black Saturday Australia (2009), and Portugal (2017) fires were all ranked amongst the top 11 deadliest fires in the last 100 years.

Under current climate change scenarios, fire regimes will change in terms of increases in burned area, severity, fire season length, frequency, and ignitions from lightning. Many parts of the world have already experienced an increase in record breaking temperatures and recurring droughts that have led to shifts in wildland fire. There is already evidence of climate-driven fire regime change in the Northern Hemisphere upper latitudes with fire risk increasing in non-traditional fire-prone countries. The consequences of human actions are here today, not in some distant future, and these are alarming and, most important, escalating.

The IAWF encourages all countries to emphasize increased international fire training and to implement easier cross-border sharing of professional fire management resources for suppression and prescribed fire opportunities. These will lessen the irrationally heavy burden any single country will have to carry to manage extreme fire seasons. Homes and communities must be better planned and built, so they are increasingly fire resistant and more adapted to natural disasters of all types. Health impacts of fires have long-term consequences, not only those that are immediate from the flames but also those from smoke and toxins, and these must be considered when planning and managing for future wildland fires. Wildfires and smoke do not recognize borders. As the global community tries to manage the new wildfire challenges, it is incumbent on everyone to prepare to support international neighbours in protecting lives and communities from fires and their impacts.

IAWF Vice-President Toddi Steelman recently said in Wildfire magazine (August 2019) that “Recent extreme weather events have catalysed public belief in, and concern about, climate change, and boosted public support for government actions to reduce its harmful impacts. This gives us a window of opportunity when conditions are right to make great strides on climate if we are strategic about it.” This window of opportunity requires people having the knowledge and political will to act now. Our global scientific community needs to publicly share knowledge learned about patterns of extreme wildland fire and weather, as well as how climate change is associated with these patterns. Our global fire management community needs to leverage its credibility to share its experiences about how climate change and its role in extreme weather is playing out in their day to day work environments. Connecting extreme weather events to real on-the-ground consequences can help more people understand how climate impacts are affecting us all.



Funding: Lake States Fire Science Consortium Intern Program 2020 Request for Proposals (posted Sep 19, 2019)

The Lake States Fire Science Consortium (LSFSC) is committed to ensuring that the ‘best available science’ is available for planning and managing northern fire-dependent ecosystems of the Lake States. Where there are current gaps in the science, the goal of the LSFSC is to assist in filling those gaps so that science informs practice and vice-versa. Unfortunately, for many local fire management issues, there are few resources available to bring managers and scientists together to solve these important issues.

In an effort to enhance the opportunities for managers and scientists to work together, and to expose future professionals to opportunities of management and research collaborations, the LSFSC requests proposals to fund research internships that address relevant fire science and management issues associated with northern fire-dependent ecosystems of the Lake States region (See our Ecosystems page for a description of fire-dependent ecosystems that are the focus of the Lake States Fire Science Consortium). Proposals must be developed by joint manager-scientist teams (i.e. both must be listed as co-PIs and equally contribute to proposal development) and outline how the research internship will address a critical need that will help improve management of fire-dependent ecosystems locally. Preference will be given to partnerships that have not yet received funding from the program.

The LSFSC anticipates awarding several $4,000 research internship awards. It is expected that 100% of the funds should go to support the undergraduate internship experience (preferably for salary, though a limited amount of funds may be used to purchase materials and supplies needed to complete the project - funds should not be used as a supplement or summer salary for graduate students). All proposals must be submitted by 5:00 PM Eastern / 4:00 PM Central on Monday, December 9, 2019 by email to Jack McGowan-Stinski. There will be no exceptions to this closing date and time.


Deadline: Dec 9, 2019
Contact Name: Jack McGowan-Stinski
Contact E-mail: mcgowan-stinski.1@osu.edu

Job: PhD Assistantship in Forest Adaptation - University of Vermont, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources - Burlington, VT (posted Sep 18, 2019)

Project: The University of Vermont, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources is seeking a PhD-level graduate student to participate in research examining the effectiveness of restoration, adaptation, and transition management techniques at fostering forest health and productivity in the face of novel climate, insect, and disease threats. This research will assess silvicultural experiments co-developed with stakeholder input with application to both urban and rural forest settings. The student will join a team of collaborators from the University of Vermont, U.S. Forest Service Northern Research Station, and Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center in developing management options to promote diverse and productive rural and urban forests despite the stress of climate change and other disturbance agents. The position is available for Summer/Fall 2020 and includes four guaranteed years of funding (stipend, tuition waiver, and health insurance).

Qualifications: M.S. in forest ecology, forestry, silviculture, biology or a closely related field.  Applicants should be able to work independently, but also cooperatively with other researchers and managers on the larger project. Applicants should also have a strong work ethic, demonstrated writing and quantitative capabilities, and a record of leadership.

Application: Interested applicants should supply all application materials to the UVM Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources (RSENR) Program (PhD in Natural Resources) by February 1, 2020 – when applying, please state your interest in this position in the “Statement of Purpose.”


Deadline: Feb 1, 2020
Location: University of Vermont, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources
Address: University of Vermont, Burlington, VT
Contact Name: Dr. Anthony D’Amato
Contact E-mail: awdamato@uvm.edu
Contact Phone: 802-656-8030

Job: Postdoc Position in Interdisciplinary Analysis of Economic Impacts of Climate Change in Alaska - University of Alaska / ACCAP - Fairbanks, AK (posted Sep 18, 2019)

The Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP) seeks a post-doctoral research fellow to explore the social and economic impacts of climate change in Alaska from an interdisciplinary perspective.

Possible sectors of analysis include but are not limited to:

  • fisheries (including ocean acidification),
  • transportation (and trans-Arctic shipping),
  • infrastructure, mineral,
  • oil & gas resource development,
  • mixed-subsistence economies, and
  • the provision of related climate services.
  • We are also interested in an analysis of the economic impacts of ACCAP’s work.

This post-doctoral fellowship includes opportunities to directly engage ACCAP’s partners and stakeholders in use-inspired basic research and knowledge co-production. The person in this position will work closely in an interdisciplinary team environment that includes a spectrum of senior scientists, junior scientists, graduate students, and research professionals. Collaborating organizations include the Center for Arctic Policy Studies (CAPS) at UAF, the Institute of Social and Economic Research (ISER) at the University of Alaska, Anchorage, and other ACCAP partner organizations.

  • Desired state date: Negotiable. As soon as possible.
  • Duration: 2 year, term funded
  • Location: International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
  • Open until filled.  

How to apply: please submit CV, contact information for three references, and a cover letter to Sarah Trainor, ACCAP Director with “Econ Post-Doc Application” in the subject line.  The cover letter should include:

  • A description of the candidate’s PhD research,
  • A statement of interest outlining potential research project, including sectors of interest, and research approach, and
  • A description of past experience with research in Alaska and/or the Arctic.

Location: International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
Contact Name: Sarah Trainor
Contact E-mail: sarah.trainor@alaska.edu

Job: Postdoc Position in Assessing Climate Change Knowledge Co-Production and Boundary Spanning in Alaska - University of Alaska / ACCAP - Fairbanks, AK (posted Sep 18, 2019)

Climate change is occurring more rapidly in the Arctic than any region on Earth. Its impacts are being felt by Indigenous peoples as well as throughout a range of societal sectors, including wildfire management. Recent scholarship suggests that boundary spanning, translational ecology, and the process of knowledge co-production are effective in bridging the gap between science and decision-making and calls for building capacity by developing processes for effective evaluation and for training boundary spanning professionals.

We seek a post-doctoral research fellow to explore one or more of these inter-related research areas of knowledge co-production and boundary spanning assessment related to climate change in Alaska.

  • Actions, processes, and mechanisms for use-inspired science.
  • Metrics of success in knowledge co-production.
  • Scientist and practitioner training in knowledge co-production and boundary spanning.

Requirements: experience and/or demonstrated capacity to contribute in one or more of the following topical areas:

  • Indigenous evaluation, indigenous knowledge, cross-cultural communication
  • Climate change science, application, communication, and knowledge co-production
  • Wildfire science and boundary spanning
  • Mixed-subsistence economies and community development

The post-doctoral research fellow will work closely in an interdisciplinary team environment that includes senior scientists, junior scientists, graduate students, and research professionals. Collaborating organizations include the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (a NOAA Regional Integrated Science and Assessment team), the Alaska Fire Science Consortium (a member of the Joint Fire Science Program Fire Science Exchange Network), and the USDA Pacific Northwest Climate Hub.

  • Desired start date: September 2019
  • Duration: 2 year, term funded
  • Location: International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks
  • Open until filled.  

How to apply: please submit CV, contact information for three references, and a cover letter to Sarah Trainor, ACCAP Director with “Post-Doc Application” in the subject line.  The cover letter should include:

  • A description of the candidate’s PhD research;
  • A discussion of the candidate’s research interests and experience relevant to one or more of the numbered research areas listed above;
  • A discussion of the candidate’s research interests and experience relevant to one or more of the bulleted topical areas listed above;
  • A brief proposed plan for investigating one or more of the research areas listed above. This should include the data collection and analysis methods with which you are experienced and familiar as well as possible additional methods you have an interest in learning.

Location: International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
Contact Name: Sarah Trainor
Contact E-mail: sarah.trainor@alaska.edu

Job: Forest Ecology Researcher - Ohio University (posted Sep 16, 2019)

We are looking for a capable student to join our Forest Ecology research team at the Masters or PhD level.  The student will use radio-labeling methods to explore seed dispersal and the spatial ecology of herbaceous species across a range of scales.  Demographic models will be paired with micro-environmental heterogeneity to compare the roles of disturbance history, animal behavior, physical gradients, and plant life history in shaping species distributions at the population and landscape scale.  In addition to research commitments, students take courses and serve as teaching assistants in the Department of Environmental and Plant Biology.  The position is fully funded including tuition waivers.

Applicants should have a GPA of at least 3.2 and an average GRE score above the 60th percentile.  A strong work ethic, quantitative skills, and the ability work independently are essential.  Applicants should be physically fit and capable of field work under less-than-ideal conditions.  Previous field experience is desirable.


Deadline: Jan 15, 2020

Job: Ph.D. Assistantship in Forest Ecology - Utah State University (posted Sep 16, 2019)

The Western Forest Initiative at Utah State University (http://westernforestinitiative.org) seeks to fill a PhD position funded by the T. W. Daniel endowment. The selected student will work in the Lutz lab on research in the three largest annually-surveyed, spatially-explicit forest plots in western North America, located in Yosemite, California (http://yfdp.org), Wind River, Washington (http://wfdp.org), and Cedar Breaks, Utah (http://ufdp.org). Experimental work can be conducted in the T. W. Daniel Experimental Forest near Logan, Utah.

The successful student can conduct research on a variety of topics, for example; spatial relationships among woody plants, forest community resistance and resilience, forest canopy-snow interactions, fuel dynamics, climate-mediated forest change, plant-soil interactions, carbon sequestration, seedling dynamics, understory-overstory interactions, or mechanisms and consequences of tree mortality. The existing dataset is particularly rich in demographic data, including annual tree mortality by cause. There will be considerable opportunity to interact with students, scientists, and academics affiliated with the Smithsonian Forest Global Earth Observatory (https://forestgeo.si.edu).


Deadline: Dec 27, 2019

Job: Ph.D Positions in Global Change Ecology - University of California (Los Angeles, CA) (posted Aug 28, 2019)

The Tingley Lab in Global Change Ecology is joining the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of California, Los Angeles and seeking creative and motivated PhD students to join the lab in the Fall of 2020. Our research utilizes field and biodiversity data to explore how large-scale anthropogenic drivers of change (e.g., climate change, land-use change, fire regimes) affect geographic distributions and community interactions over short to long timespans, from years to centuries. Most of our research explores these topics using birds as the primary study organism.

Potential research areas include: 1) the impact of climate change on birds through shifts in distributions or phenology; 2) the mechanisms that define range limits; 3) the role of wildfire in structuring biodiversity; 4) statistical modeling of distributions and assemblages; and/or 5) using historical data to understand processes of change. Research projects will have opportunities to draw from extensive existing databases as well as collect new field data at current field sites in temperate mountain systems. Enthusiasm, excellent written and oral communication abilities, and strong quantitative skills are necessary. Backgrounds in ornithology, modeling, and statistics are desired.



General: Southwest Fire Science Consortium Incident of the Year Nominations (posted May 17, 2019)

Think about fires during which science is effectively used in the decision-making process... and let's recognize them!
Below is the nomination text. We are early in the season, so please consider this while you work fire this season!

There is a great deal of decision space when managing wildland fires, and once public and firefighter safety is addressed, land managers and fire professionals have latitude when applying wildfire management strategies and tactics. The way those strategies and tactics are employed can have lasting impacts on the landscape both beneficial (e.g., reduced fire severity) as well as detrimental (e.g., increased erosion). With continued use and emphasis on managing wildfires for multiple objectives, there is an opportunity to learn and educate ourselves and others on effective ways to enhance the resource benefits of wildfires. Fire science continues to provide us with an understanding of the role fire plays on our landscapes. Every year research studies provide the fire community with new knowledge that managers and practitioners can use when making management decisions (e.g., see van Mantgem et al. 2016). The Southwest Fire Science Consortium is looking for examples of wildfire management that attempted to enhance resource benefits and that were guided by fire science knowledge. For example, given safety and suppression objectives, do you know of a 2019 incident where specific actions were taken to identify and achieve resource benefits? Examples can come from full suppression fires or those managed to meet multiple objectives. Please nominate the incident so we can learn more about these actions and decisions and recognize these efforts. Too often, the wildland fire community talks only about lessons learned from mistakes rather than those learned from successes ‐ so let’s talk success, fire use, and fire science. Nominations will be evaluated on fire outcomes and how the following factors were considered by fire managers, crews, and land managers during the wildland fire incident. We trust that safety was the overriding objective.


Deadline: Dec 10, 2019

Job: State Uplands Forester - WA DNR - Eastern Washington (posted Apr 3, 2019)

The Northeast Region of the Washington State Department of Natural Resources is currently recruiting for four Non-Perm, State Uplands Foresters (Natural Resources Specialist 1) to join our team of Silviculture Foresters. 
 
Are you someone who loves the outdoors, and is passionate about natural resource forester opportunities in Washington State? If you love working in the outdoors, appreciate a remote natural environment, and have good practical field skills with a proven ability for working in a small team, then this is the job for you.
 
These positions will assist the Silviculture Foresters in implementing sound ecological forest management that generates revenue while improving forest health and habitat.  Position responsibilities include assisting in the layout of timber sales. This work includes, locating and marking timber sale unit boundaries, tree marking, GPS mapping, locating and delineating riparian buffers or other sensitive areas, road layout, cruising, and developing detailed summary reports. Additional silvicultural duties include conducting stand surveys, preparing and administering pre-commercial thinning, tree planting and fuels reduction contracts under the agency's forest health program. In addition, this position will assess the health of stands and recommend silvicultural prescriptions and harvest strategies.
 
We have opportunities available in the following locations:

  • Arcadia (Deer Park, WA)
  • North Columbia (Colville, WA)
  • South Okanogan (Omak, WA)
  • Highlands (Loomis, WA)

Deadline: Dec 31, 2019