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Citation: Iniguez, Jose M.; Swetnam, Thomas W.; Baisan, Christopher H. 2009. Spatially and temporally variable fire regime on Rincon Reak, Arizona, USA. Fire Ecology 5(1):3-21.

Summary:


Citation: Marlon, J.R.; Bartlein, Patrick J.; Walsh, M.K.; Harrison, S.P.; Brown, K.J.; Edwards, Mary E.; Higuera, Philip E.; Power, M.J.; Anderson, R.S.; Briles, C.; Brunelle, A.; Carcaillet, C.; Daniels, M.; Hu, F.S.; Lavoie, M.; Long, C.; Minckley, T.; Richard, P. J.H.; Scott, A.C.; Shafer, D.S.; Tinner, W.; Umbanhowar, C.E. Jr.; Whitlock, C. 2009. Wildfire responses to abrupt climate change in North America. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 106(8):2519-2524.

Summary:

The authors examined charcoal and pollen records of a period of abrupt climate change beginning during the last glacial-interglacial transition to the Younger Dryas period (15 to 10 ka) to assess how fire regimes across North America were affected.



Citation: Haire, Sandra L.; McGarigal, Kevin. 2009. Changes in fire severity across gradients of climate, fire size, and topography: a landscape ecological perspective. Fire Ecology 5(2):86-103.

Summary:

The authors examined the effects of climate, specifically drought, and local topography on fire severity across a gradient of fire sizes and vegetation types.



Citation: Margolis, Ellis Q.; Balmat, Jeff. 2009. Fire history and fire-climate relationships along a fire regime gradient in the Santa Fe Municipal Watershed, NM, USA. Forest Ecology and Management 258(11):2416-2430.

Summary:

The authors reconstructed the historical fire regime along a gradient of elevation and forest type using dendroecological techniques and assess historic climate-fire relationships between forest types in the Santa Fe River watershed.



Citation: Fulé, Peter Z.; Korb, Julie E.; Wu, Rosalind. 2009. Changes in forest structure of a mixed conifer forest, southwestern Colorado, USA. Forest Ecology and Management 258(7):1200-1210.

Summary:

The authors reconstructed the historical fire regime and stand structure of a mixed-conifer forest in southwestern Colorado to determine how stand structure and composition have changed over time.



Citation: Krawchuk, Meg A.; Moritz, Max A.; Parisien, Marc-André; Van Dorn, Jeff; Hayhoe, Katharine. 2009. Global pyrogeography: the current and future distribution of wildfire. PLoS ONE 4(4):e5102.

Summary:

The authors quantified environmental drivers of global wildfire including climate conditions at a coarse spatiotemporal resolution in order to model future projections of global fire patterns under climate change models.



Citation: Littell, Jeremy S.; McKenzie, Donald; Peterson, David L.; Westerling, Anthony L. 2009. Climate and wildfire area burned in western U.S. ecoprovinces, 1916-2003. Ecological Applications 19(4):1003-1021.

Summary:

The authors applied generalized linear models to large-scale, interannual and/or seasonal climate variables of precipitation, temperature, and the Palmer drought severity index (PDSI) to area burned across vegetation types of the western U.S.



Citation: Lutz, James A.; van Wagtendonk, Jan W.; Thode, Andrea E.; Miller, Jay D.; Franklin, Jerry F. 2009. Climate, lightning ignitions, and fire severity in Yosemite National Park, California, USA. International Journal of Wildland Fire 18(7):765-774.

Summary:

The authors examined fire-climate relationships between snowpack accumulation and fire ignition, size, and severity of lightning-ignited fires from 1984 to 2005.



Citation: Hurteau, Matthew D.; North, Malcom P. 2008. Mixed-conifer understory response to climate change, nitrogen, and fire. Global Change Biology 14(7):1543-1552.

Summary:

The authors experimentally tested the effects of increasing and decreasing snowpack depth, increasing nitrogen, and prescribed fire on understory fuel diversity and biomass production in a mixed-conifer forest.



Citation: Fulé, Peter Z. 2008. Does it make sense to restore wildland fire in changing climate? Restoration Ecology 16(4):526-531.

Summary:

This article discusses the relevance of reference conditions in the restoration of surface fire-adapted forests and possible alternative forest management strategies in the face of climate change.