Full Citation: Fulé, Peter Z. 2008. Does it make sense to restore wildland fire in changing climate? Restoration Ecology 16(4):526-531.
External Identifier(s): 10.1111/j.1526-100X.2008.00489.x Digital Object Identifier
Location: Western U.S.
Ecosystem types: Forested ecosystems
Southwest FireCLIME Keywords: None
FRAMES Keywords: Abies concolor, ponderosa pine, climate change, fire restoration, Jeffrey pine, Durango pine, Abies lasiocarpa, Pinus ponderosa, Pinus jeffreyi, adaptation, climatology, coniferous forest, distribution, disturbance, ecosystem dynamics, ecotones, elevation, fire adaptations, fire exclusion, fire frequency, fire hazard reduction, fire management, fire regimes, forest management, histories, Picea spp., pine forests, Pinus durangensis, Pseudotsuga menziesii, Douglas-fir, thinning, vegetation surveys, wildfires

Does it make sense to restore wildland fire in changing climate?

Peter Z. Fulé


Summary - what did the authors do and why?

This article discusses the relevance of reference conditions in the restoration of surface fire-adapted forests and possible alternative forest management strategies in the face of climate change.


Publication findings:

Climate change projections suggest a shift toward hotter and drier conditions across the west resulting in an approximately 50 to 500% increase in area burned across the western U.S. Fire will continue to play an important role in shaping future forests affected by climate change. Forest restoration based on historical reference conditions is consistent with resilience to the changing climate and an increase in fire. 

Climate and Fire Linkages

Climate change projections suggest a shift toward hotter and drier conditions across the west resulting in an approximately 50 to 500% increase in area burned across the western U.S.

Climate change projections suggest a shift toward hotter and drier conditions across the west resulting in an approximately 50 to 500% increase in area burned across the western U.S.

Fire and Ecosystem Effects Linkages

Fire will continue to play an important role in shaping future forests affected by climate change. Forest restoration based on historical reference conditions is consistent with resilience to the changing climate and an increase in fire.