Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Person: Gorte
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Without a significant organization change, our ability to manage large fires will be compromised. ... We need a strong local initial- and extended-attack fire program and an aggressive ecosystem restoration program.'

Person:
Year: 2001
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The fire season of 2000 is one of the most severe on record, burning approximately seven million acres by the end of September—over 2.5 times the 10-year average of 2.6 million acres. Fires burning in the wildland-urban interface have resulted in...

Person: Hesseln, Rideout
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'We can postpone the inevitible blazes, but-as the 2000 fire season showed-not indefinitely...' ... 'The relative severity of the 2000 fire season mobilized public opinion behind a large-scale program to reduce the fire...

Person: Dombeck
Year: 2001
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Executive Summary: On August 8, 2000, President Clinton asked Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt and Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman to prepare a report that recommends how best to respond to this year*s severe fires, reduce the impacts of these...

Person:
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text... 'The press and politicians called fire season 2000 'a natural disaster.' The fires were natural, but the 'disaster' was how much the United States spent to fight them.'

Person: Williams
Year: 2001
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fires affect animals mainly through effects on their habitat. Fires often cause short-term increases in wildlife foods that contribute to increases in populations of some animals. These increases are moderated by the animals' ability to thrive in...

Person: Smith, Smith, Schreiner, Telfer, Hooper, Huff, Lyon
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS