Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 46

America does not have a fire problem. It has many fire problems. The policy of fire exclusion through most of the 20th century seemed successful at first but eventually lead to larger, more intense, and damaging fires. By the mid-1970s federal agencies...

Person: Pyne
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

From the text ... 'State foresters provide leadership in building community capacity to manage forest resources, promoting accountability and efficiency, addressing threats to forests, and promoting the role of forests in the environmental and...

Person: Smith
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In forests, termites serve as ''soil engineers,'' translocating mineral soil to the surface, constructing macropores to improve water infiltration, increase soil minerals and organic carbon, facilitate the growth of microbes and...

Person: Peterson
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Policymakers and forestry experts recognize that, after a century of fire suppression, there is a crisis in forest health: fire-dependent ecosystems starved of regular fire cycles now have unhealthy fuel loads and experience...

Person: Aplet, Wilmer
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Managing wildland fire to achieve land and resource management goals continues to be riddled with misperceptions and misinformation, which have limited both programmatic growth and overall effectiveness. As more credibility has...

Person: Zimmerman, Sexton
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Carbon sequestration by forested ecosystems offers a potential climate change mitigation benefit. However, wildfire has the potential to reverse this benefit. In the western United States, climate change and land management practices have led to...

Person: Wiedinmyer, Hurteau
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This paper discusses the overall effects fire has on the carbon budget of boreal forests. Studies on using the boreal forest as a means to sequester carbon have not adequately accounted for these effects. Among other approaches, it has been suggested...

Person: Conard, Kasischke
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The federal wildland Fire Management Policy and Program Review represents the latest stage in the evolution of wildland fire management. This policy directs changes that consolidate past fire management practices into a single direction to achieve...

Person: Cole, McCool, Borrie, O'Loughlin, Zimmerman, Bunnell
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Lyon, Huff, Hooper, Telfer, Schreiner, Smith, Lyon, Brown, Huff, Smith
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

1 Areas burned annually in the United States between 1700 and 1990 were derived from published estimates of pre-European burning rates and from wildfire statistics of the US Forest Service. Changes in live and dead vegetation following fire and fire...

Person: Houghton, Hackler, Lawrence
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS