Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

Filter Results

Person

Displaying 11 - 20 of 105

October 9th, 2018. Part of the Alaska Fire Science Consortium workshop, the presentation gave a final report on fuel treatments.

Person: Little, Jandt
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

The Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) field campaign funded by NASA’s Terrestrial Ecology Program began in 2015. Its science objectives are to 1) improve understanding of Arctic and boreal ecosystem response to environmental change, and 2...

Person: Jandt
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildland fire is the dominant disturbance agent of the boreal forest of Alaska. Currently, about 80% of the population of Alaska resides in communities potentially at risk from wildland fire. The wildland fire threat to these settlements is increasing...

Person: Little, Jandt, Drury, Molina, Lane
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Hearing about climate-driven plant community changes takes on new meaning when they name names of the passengers who might not be boarding the flight to the future. A recent paper by Hollingsworth et al. (2013) does just that, analyzing fire severity...

Person: Jandt
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

In this short but powerful paper authors Mann, Rupp, Olson and Duffy look for evidence that Alaska’s forests are already responding to changes in fire regime. They use a tool that was developed in lock-step with Alaska fire management agencies called...

Person: Jandt
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Mechanical (e.g., shearblading) and manual (e.g., thinning) fuel treatments have become the preferred strategy of many fire managers and agencies for reducing fire hazard in boreal forests. This study attempts to characterize the effectiveness of four...

Person: Butler, Ottmar, Rupp, Jandt, Miller, Howard, Schmoll, Theisen, Vihnanek, Jimenez
Year: 2013
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A 1977 tundra fire burned a hillslope where prefire soils and vegetation ranged from poorly drained moist tussock-shrub tundra on the lower slopes to well-drained dwarf shrub tundra on the back slope and very poorly drained wet sedge meadow on the flat...

Person: Racine, Jandt, Meyers, Dennis
Year: 2004
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Lichen regeneration timelines are needed to establish sound fire management guidelines for caribou (Rangifer tarandus) winter range. Paired burned and unburned permanent vegetative cover transects were established after 1981, 1977, and 1972 tundra...

Person: Jandt, Joly, Meyers, Racine
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Caribou are one of the most charismatic and enigmatic animals of the high north-and the most important subsistence mammal in Alaska. Today most barren-ground caribou herds in North America are in decline, with some herds down >80% in 30 years...

Person: Jandt, Joly
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Eric Miller, BLM Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist, describes the 2017 re-survey of the 2007 mega-fire on the North Slope of Alaska. He shows surprising findings with regard to subterranean ice feature degradation, vegetation changes and recovery,...

Person: Jandt, Baughman, Jones, Miller
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES