Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 91 - 100 of 168

Linear programming techniques are used to optimally place fire suppression resources in a presuppression role. Travel times required to reach individual cells within a forest region (attack times) are calculated using fire behavior models and attack...

Person: Anderson, Lee
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The use of satellite remote sensing to assess vegetation greenness was investigated over the Western United States in 1989 and expanded to the entire conterminous United States during l990. This study utilizes the Advanced Very High Resolution...

Person: Burgan, Hartford, Eidenshink, Werth
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The computer simulation process used by the National Forests and other wildland protection agencies for strategic fire planning evaluates alternatives based on the range of probable fire behavior conditions that may be expected on the unit over a total...

Person: Chase
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Geographic Information System (GIS) is used to delineate critical zones of extremely high fire danger. The objective is to develop effective spatial strategies for the prevention and suppression of wildland fires. To minimize costs and losses due to...

Person: Chou
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The 1989 fire season was the most severe in 71-years of recorded fire history in Manitoba. A total of 1147 fires burned 3.28 million ha and cost over $63 million (CDN) to suppress. The events of 1989 resulted in the development and implementation of a...

Person: Hirsch
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A commonly available plastic garden-type soaker hose was tested in a 'series' configuration to determine the suitability of using this hose type to contain wildland fires. The bursting strength was determined for three hose-types (the RCR-...

Person: Kanjanakunchorn, Woodard, McDonald
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Ground fuels in aspen forests of central Alberta even after considerable periods of dry weather are moist and do not easily ignite, nor sustain combustion. It was hypothesized that low flammability of aspen ground fuels is significantly affected by...

Person: Rothwell, Woodard, Samran
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This paper describes an information system that uses National Weather Service computer-generated forecasts to automatically produce 1- and 2-day fire severity forecasts for 49 States. There are two computer models - the limited fine mesh model and the...

Person: Simard, Eenigenburg
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The term 'tree crown street' has been coined to describe the pattern of burned or partially burned tree crowns, aligned roughly parallel to the general direction of fire spread, that is often left in the wake of crowning forest fires. Within...

Person: Alexander, Cheney, Trevitt
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Smoldering spread rates (cm h-1) are derived from the results of an experimental evaluation of the unit area burning rate of smoldering material (g cm-2 h-1). The unit area burning rate, which is the load loss rate normal to the smoldering surface,...

Person: Frandsen
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS