Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 99

The Inuvialuit Settlement Region (ISR) in the western Canadian Arctic is experiencing environmental changes that affect subsistence harvesting practices and are of concern to local communities. In order to assess the impacts of multiple disturbances on...

Person: Tyson, Lantz, Ban
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Much recent research has investigated the effects of burning on mature black spruce (Picea mariana) forests in interior Alaska, however little research has focused on how frequent reburning affects soil organic layer (SOL) vulnerability in these...

Person: Hoy, Turetsky, Kasischke
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

There are fundamental spatial and temporal disconnects between the specific policies that have been crafted to address our wildfire challenges. The biophysical changes in fuels, wildfire behavior, and climate have created a new set of conditions for...

Person: Steelman
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Questions: How does fire severity, measured as depth of burn of ground layer fuels, control the regeneration of understorey species across black spruce-dominated stands varying in pre-fire organic layer depths? Are successional shifts from evergreen to...

Person: Gibson, Turetsky, Cottenie, Kane, Houle, Kasischke
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

1. Wildfires are the principal disturbance in the boreal forest, and their size and frequency are increasing as the climate warms. Impacts of fires on boreal wildlife are largely unknown, especially for the tens of millions of waterfowl that breed in...

Person: Lewis, Schmutz, Amundson, Lindberg
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildfires are a common disturbance event in the Canadian boreal forest. Within event boundaries, the level of vegetation mortality varies greatly. Understanding where surviving vegetation occurs within fire events and how this relates to pre-fire...

Person: Ferster, Eskelson, Andison, LeMay
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Environment and Climate Change Canada's FireWork air quality (AQ) forecast system for North America with near-real-time biomass burning emissions has been running experimentally during the Canadian wildfire season since 2013. The system runs twice...

Person: Pavlovic, Chen, Anderson, Moran, Beaulieu, Davignon, Cousineau
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

While the growing literature on forest ecosystem services has examined the value and significance of a range of services, our understanding of the health-related benefits of ecosystem services from forests is still limited. To characterize the role of...

Person: Walton, Poudyal, Hepinstall-Cymerman, Gaither, Boley
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildfire activity in boreal forests is projected to increase dramatically in response to anthropogenic climate change. By altering the spatial arrangement of fuels, land-cover configuration may interact with climate change to influence fire-regime...

Person: Dash, Fraterrigo, Hu
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

We examined landscape exposure to wildfire potential, insects and disease risk, and urban and exurban development for the conterminous US (CONUS). Our analysis relied on spatial data used by federal agencies to evaluate these stressors nationally. We...

Person: Kerns, Kim, Kline, Day
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS