Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

Filter Results

Year

Displaying 1 - 10 of 20

From the text ... 'The 1988 fire season showed us much about the importance of basing decisions on fire regimes and their associated fire behavior characteristics. Although our policies are necessarily broad, we are learnng that implementation of...

Person: Brown, Mutch, Weatherspoon, Wakimoto, Williams
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

To trully allow fires to play their natural role in wilderness ecosystems, it is sometimes necessary to have large fires of long duration. Large fires are ecologically significant events that drive many other ecosystem processes. However, these fires...

Person: Brown, Mutch, Weatherspoon, Wakimoto, van Wagtendonk
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Two maps for each of the four seasons reveal sharp contrasts in the amount of rainfall received in various parts of the United States in wet seasons. Two other maps for each season show the percentage of the seasons which...

Person: Visher
Year: 1950
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Although an increasing frequency of forest fires has been suggested as a consequence of global warming, there are no empirical data that have shown climatically driven increases in fire frequency since the warming that has followed the end of the...

Person: Bergeron, Flannigan
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Studies of anticipated effects of global warming tend to concentrate on the physiological limits of individual organisms, and imputed modifications to biome distributions expresed as climax ecosystems. Changes in distributions of individual species and...

Person: Holten, Paulsen, Oechel, Suffling
Year: 1993
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Ring-width chronologies from three white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) and two jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) sites in the boreal forest of northern Alberta were constructed to determine whether they could provide proxy records of monthly...

Person: Larsen, Macdonald
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Changing climate and land use appear to importantly affect the biosphere by way of impacts on fire regimes. Feedback effects on climate and air quality are likely through emissions of trace gases, aerosols, and particulates that affect radiation...

Person: Clark, Stocks
Year: 1993
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

1. A fire of unusually great severity (deep burning) burned across the forest-tundra near Inuvik, Northwest Territories from August 8 to 18, 1968. 2. Burned-unburned paired study sites around the fire perimeter, which had been established in both...

Person: Landhausser, Wein
Year: 1993
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

1 The postglacial history of jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) at its northernmost distribution limit in the upper boreal forest, along the Grande Riviere de la Baleine (northern Quebec), was reconstructed by using radiocarbon-dated conifer...

Person: Desponts, Payette
Year: 1993
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

1. Pollen analysis of sediment cores from the four zones that comprise the forest-tundra transition in northern Quebec provide a history of the vegetation that can be compared with extensive macrofossil data from the region. Basal radiocarbon dates...

Person: Gajewski, Payette, Ritchie
Year: 1993
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS