Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Determination of the direct causal factors controlling wildfires is key to understanding wildfire-vegetation-climate dynamics in a changing climate and for developing sustainable management strategies for biodiversity conservation and maintenance of...

Person: Senici, Chen, Bergeron, Cyr
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The observed long-term decrease in the regional fire activity of Eastern Canada results in excessive accumulation of organic layer on the forest floor of coniferous forests, which may affect climate-growth relationships in canopy trees. To test this...

Person: Drobyshev, Simard, Bergeron, Hofgaard
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The differences between boreal forest landscapes produced by natural disturbance regimes and landscapes produced by harvesting are important and increasingly well documented. To continue harvesting operations while maintaining biodiversity and other...

Person: Cyr, Gauthier, Etheridge, Kayahara, Bergeron
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The northern Temiscamingue region (western Quebec) sustained regional-scale pulses of natural disturbances during the 1850-2000 period, such as severe fires during the 1908-1926 period, two severe spruce budworm outbreaks that occurred in 1909-1918 and...

Person: Bouchard, Kneeshaw, Bergeron
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

North American jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) stands are generally characterized by an even-aged structure resulting from high intensity fires (HIF). However, non-lethal fires of moderate intensity (MIF), which leave behind surviving trees, have...

Person: Smirnova, Bergeron, Brais
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

We present here a 7000-year wildfire reconstruction based on sedimentary charcoal series from five lakes located south of Hudson Bay in eastern boreal North America. The reconstruction shows a significant downward trend in the frequency of large fires...

Person: Hély, Girardin, Ali, Carcaillet, Brewer, Bergeron
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

An original method is proposed for estimating past carbon emissions from fires in order to understand long-term changes in the biomass burning that, together with vegetation cover, act on the global carbon cycle and climate. The past carbon release...

Person: Bremond, Carcaillet, Favier, Ali, Paitre, Bégin, Bergeron, Richard
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

The relative importance of fire and flooding on the population dynamics of eastern white-cedar (Thuja occidentalis L.) and black ash (Fraxinus nigra Marsh.) was evaluated in eight old-growth riparian stands of southwestern boreal Quebec, Canada. Rising...

Person: Denneler, Asselin, Bergeron, Bégin
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS