Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Ecosystem structure and function are strongly affected by disturbance events, many of which in North America are associated with seasonal temperature extremes, wildfires, and tropical storms. This study was conducted to evaluate patterns in a 19-year...

Person: Potter, Ping-Ning, Kumar, Kucharik, Klooster, Genovese, Cohen, Healey
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Combustion of fossil fuel and vegetation produces large quantities of black canbon particles (BCP) which are dispersed by winds over large areas. Once deposited in the sediment, BCP constitute an historic record of anthropogenic activities and...

Person: Stoffyn-Egli, Potter, Leonard, Pocklington
Year: 1997
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

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Person: Nute, Potter, Cheng, Dass, Glende, Maierv, Routh, Uchiyama, Wang, Witzig, Twery, Knopp, Thomasma, Rauscher
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Combustion of woody material produces and releases water, but the effects of this water on the atmospheric circulation created by a wildfire are rarely recognized, let alone understood. This paper presents observational data and basic physical...

Person: Potter
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This paper analyzes data from 339 large wildland fires that occurred in the Continental United States from 1971 through 1984. Each fire burned 1,000 acres (400 ha) or more. Each fire was associated with the nearest upper-air weather station and...

Person: Potter
Year: 1997
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Combustion of woody material produces and releases water, but the effects of this water on the atmospheric circulation created by a wildfire are rarely recognized, let alone understood. This paper presents observational data and basic physical...

Person: Potter
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Ecosystem structure and function are strongly affected by disturbance events, many of which in North America are associated with seasonal temperature extremes, wildfires, and tropical storms. This study was conducted to evaluate patterns in a 19-year...

Person: Potter, Ping-Ning, Kumar, Kucharik, Klooster, Genovese, Cohen, Healey
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The Haines Index is a frequently used tool in wildfire weather forecasting and monitoring. Introduced in 1988 as the 'Lower Atmospheric Severity Index,' this index is a function of temperature and dewpoint in the lower troposphere, and has...

Person: Potter, Winkler, Wilhelm, Shadbolt
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

With the creation of the Fire Consortia for the Advanced Modeling of Meteorology and Smoke (FCAMMS) (http://www.fs.fed.us/fcamms), the USDA Forest Service has begun to develop a deeper understanding of how a...

Person: Charney, Potter, Heilman, Bian
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES