Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

There is still much uncertainty as to how wildfire affects the accumulation of burn residues (such as black carbon (BC)) in the soil, and the corresponding changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) composition in boreal forests. We investigated SOC and BC...

Person: Kane, Hockaday, Turetsky, Masiello, Valentine, Finney, Baldock
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This paper assesses the resilience of Alaska's boreal forest system to rapid climatic change. Recent warming is associated with reduced growth of dominant tree species, plant disease and insect outbreaks, warming and thawing of permafrost, drying...

Person: Chapin, McGuire, Ruess, Hollingsworth, Mack, Johnstone, Kasischke, Euskirchen, Jones, Jorgenson, Kielland, Kofinas, Turetsky, Yarie, Lloyd, Taylor
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Northern ecosystem processes play out across scales that are rare elsewhere on contemporary earth: large ranging predator–prey systems are still operational, invasive species are rare, and large-scale natural disturbances occur extensively....

Person: Turetsky, Baltzer, Johnstone, Mack, McCann, Schuur
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Biomass burning in the Alaskan interior is already a major disturbance and source of carbon emissions, and is likely to increase in response to the warming and drying predicted for the future climate. In addition to quantifying changes to the spatial...

Person: Barrett, Kasischke, McGuire, Turetsky, Kane
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

There is still much uncertainty as to how wildfire affects the accumulation of burn residues (such as black carbon (BC)) in the soil, and the corresponding changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) composition in boreal forests. We investigated SOC and BC...

Person: Kane, Hockaday, Turetsky, Masiello, Valentine, Finney, Baldock
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This paper assesses the resilience of Alaska's boreal forest system to rapid climatic change. Recent warming is associated with reduced growth of dominant tree species, plant disease and insect outbreaks, warming and thawing of permafrost, drying...

Person: Chapin, McGuire, Ruess, Hollingsworth, Mack, Johnstone, Kasischke, Euskirchen, Jones, Jorgenson, Kielland, Kofinas, Turetsky, Yarie, Lloyd, Taylor
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Ecosystem models have not comprehensively considered how interactions among fire disturbance, soil environmental conditions, and biogeochemical processes affect ecosystem dynamics in boreal forest ecosystems. In this study, we implemented a dynamic...

Person: Yi, McGuire, Kasischke, Harden, Manies, Mack, Turetsky
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Climate change has increased the area affected by forest fires each year in boreal North America. Increases in burned area and fire frequency are expected to stimulate boreal carbon losses. However, the impact of wildfires on carbon emissions is also...

Person: Turetsky, Kane, Harden, Ottmar, Maines, Hoy, Kasischke
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

In the boreal forests of interior Alaska, feedbacks that link forest soils, fire characteristics, and plant traits have supported stable cycles of forest succession for the past 6000 years. This high resilience of forest stands to fire disturbance is...

Person: Johnstone, Chapin, Hollingsworth, Mack, Romanovsky, Turetsky
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Shifts in moss communities may affect the resilience of boreal ecosystems to a changing climate because of the role of moss species in regulating soil climate and biogeochemical cycling. Here, we use long-term data analysis and literature synthesis to...

Person: Turetsky, Mack, Hollingsworth, Harden
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES