Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 72

Over 2,200 wildfires occur in the United States each year. In March of 2006 residents in the Texas panhandle suffered through over a week of devastating wildfires that took 12 lives and damaged over $16 million in property. In 2004, wildfires burned 8...

Person:
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

An algorithm for wildfire occurrence is introduced for incorporation into a numerical model of drainage basin evolution. Within the model, fire return intervals are determined using a stochastic rule set and fire sizes are assigned according to a...

Person: Martin
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The strategy known as wildland fire use, in which lightning-ignited fires are allowed to burn, is rapidly gaining momentum in the fire management community. Managers need to know the consequences of an increase in area burned that might result from an...

Person: Miller
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

An efficient and accurate inventory of forest fuels at large scales is critical for assessment of forest fire hazards across landscapes. The Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the USDA Forest Service conducts a national inventory of fuels...

Person: Westfall, Woodall
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

For at least two decades, expansion of low-density residential development at the wildland-urban interface has been widely recognized as a primary factor influencing the management of US national forests. We estimate the location, extent, and trends in...

Person: Theobald, Romme
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A description is made of a long run forest fire danger index. The index is based on the principle that forest fires follow a self-organized critical behavior, which establishes that under a wide variety of circumstances, forest fires maintain an...

Person: Torres-Rojo, Magana-Torres, Ramirez-Fuentes
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire management agencies in Canada are mandated with protecting multiple forest values from wildfire. Deciding where to reduce fire hazard and how to allocate resources and fire suppression efforts requires an understanding of the values-at-risk from...

Person: Neupane, Boxall, McFarlane, Pelletier
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The ability of mechanical fuel reduction treatments to mitigate severe fire behavior in dry mixed conifer forests is of interest to land managers as well as the public. We compared fuel loads and indices of crown fire potential to test treatment...

Person: Mason, Baker, Cram, Boren, Fernald, VanLeeuwen
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This paper is based on a survey of homeowners living adjacent to the extensive and heavily vegetated North Saskatchewan River Valley and Ravine System in Edmonton, Alberta. Residents in a random sample of 436 households adjacent to this urban natural...

Person: McGee
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This paper investigates the impact of including the risk of fire in an optimal tree harvesting model at the stand level, assuming timber prices follow a mean-reverting stochastic process. The relevant partial differential equation is derived under...

Person: Insley, Lei
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS