Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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From the text ... 'Fire Management Today received 285 images from 69 people for our 2007 photo contest.'

Person:
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

We used a national household survey to examine knowledge, attitudes, and preferences pertaining to wildland fire. First, we present nationwide results and trends. Then, we examine opinions across region and race. Despite some regional variation,...

Person: Bowker, Lim, Cordell, Green, Rideout-Hanzak, Johnson
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the book jacket...'From prehistory to the present-day conservation movement, Stephen J. Pyne's narrative explores the efforts of sucessive American cultures to master this forbidding kind of fire and to use it to shape the landscape. He...

Person: Pyne
Year: 1982
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Created through the Wildfire Disaster Recovery Act of 1989 (PL 101-286), in response to the destructive western fire season of 1987 and the Yellowstone fires of 1988, the Commission was asked to consider the environmental and economic effects of...

Person:
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

After the containment of large wildland fires, major onsite and downstream effects including lost soil productivity, watershed response, increased vulnerability to invasive weeds, and downstream sedimentation can cause threats to human life and...

Person: Calkin, Jones, Hyde
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fire behavior modeling systems are playing an increasingly important role in identifying areas of the wildland-urban interface (WUI) that could support intense and fast-moving wildfires. The modeling systems also can be used to prioritize areas for...

Person: Cheyette, Rupp, Rodman
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS