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The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

Displaying 26 - 50 of 14911

Kiefer, Zhong, Heilman, Charney, Bian
An improved understanding of atmospheric perturbations within and above a forest during a wildland fire has relevance to many aspects of wildland fires including fire spread, smoke transport and dispersion, and tree mortality. In this study, the ARPS‐CANOPY model, a version of…
Year: 2018
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Ronchi, Gwynne, Rein, Wadhwani, Intini, Bergstedt
The number of evacuees worldwide during wildfire keep rising, year after year. Fire evacuations at the wildland-urban interfaces (WUI) pose a serious challenge to fire and emergency services and are a global issue affecting thousands of communities around the world. But to date…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Ward, Shevliakova, Malyshev, Lamarque, Wittenberg
Connections between wildfires and modes of variability in climate are sought as a means for predicting fire activity on interannual to multi-decadal timescales. Several fire drivers, such as temperature and local drought index, have been shown to vary on these timescales, and…
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Landry, Partanen, Matthews
Aerosols emitted by landscape fires affect many climatic processes. Here, we combined an aerosol–climate model and a coupled climate-carbon model to study the carbon cycle and climate effects caused by fire-emitted aerosols (FEA) forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Li, Lawrence, Bond-Lamberty
Fire is a global phenomenon and tightly interacts with the biosphere and climate. This study provides the first quantitative assessment and understanding of fire's influence on the global annual land surface air temperature and energy budget through its impact on terrestrial…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Lasslop, Kloster
We assess the influence of humans on burned area simulated with a dynamic global vegetation model. The human impact in the model is based on population density and cropland fraction, which were identified as important drivers of burned area in analyses of global datasets, and…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Masrur, Petrov, DeGroot
Recent years have seen an increased frequency of wildfire events in different parts of Arctic tundra ecosystems. Contemporary studies have largely attributed these wildfire events to the Arctic's rapidly changing climate and increased atmospheric disturbances (i.e. thunderstorms…
Year: 2018
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Liu
Research has traditionally focused on the wildfire impacts of climate and vegetation, using the approaches developed mainly based on empirical and statistical weather–fire behavior relationships as well as empirical and process-based vegetation–fire relationships. Recent studies…
Year: 2018
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Archibald, Lehmann, Belcher, Bond, Bradstock, Daniau, Dexter, Forrestel, Greve, He, Higgins, Hoffmann, Lamont, McGlinn, Moncrieff, Osborne, Pausas, Price, Ripley, Rogers, Schwilk, Simon, Turetsky, Van der Werf, Zanne
Roughly 3% of the Earth's land surface burns annually, representing a critical exchange of energy and matter between the land and atmosphere via combustion. Fires range from slow smouldering peat fires, to low-intensity surface fires, to intense crown fires, depending on…
Year: 2018
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Pellegrini, Ahlström, Hobbie, Reich, Nieradzik, Staver, Scharenbroch, Jumpponen, Anderegg, Randerson, Jackson
Fire frequency is changing globally and is projected to affect the global carbon cycle and climate. However, uncertainty about how ecosystems respond to decadal changes in fire frequency makes it difficult to predict the effects of altered fire regimes on the carbon cycle; for…
Year: 2018
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Brenkert-Smith
As the wildland-urban interface (WUI) grows in size and density and increasing levels of funding are being directed toward education and outreach programs targeting residents in these communities, it is becoming increasingly important to investigate residents’ responses to…
Year: 2006
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Bond, Keane
Fire is both a natural and anthropogenic disturbance influencing the distribution, structure, and functioning of terrestrial ecosystems around the world. Many plants and animals depend on fire for their continued existence. Others species, such as rainforest plants species, are…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Haskell
Highlights events and publications from the JFSP fire science exchange network.
Year: 2018
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Molan, Kim, Lu, Wylie, Zhu
The discontinuous permafrost zone is one of the world’s most sensitive areas to climate change. Alaskan boreal forest is underlain by discontinuous permafrost, and wildfires are one of the most influential agents negatively impacting the condition of permafrost in the arctic…
Year: 2018
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Jandt, Joly
Caribou are one of the most charismatic and enigmatic animals of the high north-and the most important subsistence mammal in Alaska. Today most barren-ground caribou herds in North America are in decline, with some herds down >80% in 30 years prompting Canada to list the…
Year: 2018
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Manies, Harden, Fuller, Turetsky
Boreal soils play a critical role in the global carbon (C) cycle; therefore, it is important to understand the mechanisms that control soil C accumulation and loss for this region. Examining C & nitrogen (N) accumulation rates over decades to centuries may provide additional…
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Young-Robertson, Bolton, Bhatt, Cristóbal, Thoman
The terrestrial water cycle contains large uncertainties that impact our understanding of water budgets and climate dynamics. Water storage is a key uncertainty in the boreal water budget, with tree water storage often ignored. The goal of this study is to quantify tree water…
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wotton, Flannigan, Marshall
Much research has been carried out on the potential impacts of climate change on forest fire activity in the boreal forest. Indeed, there is a general consensus that, while change will vary regionally across the vast extent of the boreal, in general the fire environment will…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Miller
A guide produced for RX-310 Introduction to Fire Effects class in Alaska summarizing the properties of moss duff—the primary surface fuel in Alaska’s interior coniferous forests. Eric reviews fuelbed properties of duff, including bulk density, depth, surface area to volume ratio…
Year: 2010
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Brown, Kielland, Euskirchen, Brinkman, Ruess, Kellie
Fire severity is an important control over regeneration of deciduous species and can influence the overall quality of habitat for herbivores, such as moose (Alces alces (Linnaeus, 1758)), but the relationships between availability and duration of biomass production and moose…
Year: 2018
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

The NWCG Report on Wildland Firefighter Fatalities in the United States: 2007-2016 is a report examining the causes of death for firefighters who work for various organizations across the United States. We assessed trends and common factors of fatalities to help mitigate those…
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Aleman, Hennebelle, Vannière, Blarquez
[from the text] Paleofire research is the study of past fire regimes using a suite of proxies (frequency, area burned, severity, intensity, etc.). Charcoal preserved in sedimentary archives constitutes one of the most ubiquitous measures of past fire regimes along with fire-…
Year: 2018
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Jolly, Johnson
The most destructive wildland fires occur in mixtures of living and dead vegetation, yet very little attention has been given to the fundamental differences between factors that control their flammability. Historically, moisture content has been used to evaluate the relative…
Year: 2018
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Tedim, Leone, Amraoui, Bouillon, Coughlan, Delogu, Fernandes, Ferreira, McCaffrey, McGee, Parente, Paton, Pereira, Ribeiro, Viegas, Xanthopoulos
Every year worldwide some extraordinary wildfires occur, overwhelming suppression capabilities, causing substantial damages, and often resulting in fatalities. Given their increasing frequency, there is a debate about how to address these wildfires with significant social…
Year: 2018
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Walding, Williams, McGarvie, Belcher
Most previous research has assessed the ability of the National Fire Danger Rating System (NFDRS) to portray fire activity at either single sites or on small spatial scales, despite it being a nation-wide system. This study seeks to examine the relationships between a set of…
Year: 2018
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES