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Strategies for reducing carbon dioxide emissions include substitution of fossil fuel with bioenergy from forests, where carbon emitted is expected to be recaptured in the growth of new biomass to achieve zero net emissions, and forest thinning to...

Person: Hudiburg, Law, Wirth, Luyssaert
Year: 2011
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

This study investigated occupational exposure to wood and vegetative smoke in a group of 28 forest firefighters at prescribed forest burns in a southeastern U.S. Forest during the winters of 2003-2005. During burn activities, 203 individual person-day...

Person: Adetona, Dunn, Hall, Achtemeier, Stock, Naeher
Year: 2011
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Conventional wisdom within American federal fire management agencies suggests that external influence such as community or political pressure for aggressive suppression are key factors circumscribing the ability to execute less aggressive fire...

Person: Steelman, McCaffrey
Year: 2011
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Prescribed burning, in combination with mechanical thinning, is a successful method for reducing heavy fuel loads from forest floors and thereby lowering the risk of catastrophic wildfire. However, an undesirable consequence of managed fire is the...

Person: Robinson, Zhao, Zack, Brindley, Portz, Quarterman, Long, Herckes
Year: 2011
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Biomass burning is often associated with climate oscillations. For example, biomass burning in South-east Asia is strongly linked to El Nino-southern oscillation activity. During October and November of the 2006 El Nino year, a substantial increase in...

Person: Nara, Tanimoto, Nojiri, Mukai, Zeng, Tohjima, Machida
Year: 2011
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Coarse woody debris serves many functions in forest ecosystem processes and has important implications for fire management as it affects air quality, soil heating and carbon budgets when it combusts. There is relatively little research evaluating the...

Person: Hyde, Smith, Ottmar, Alvarado, Morgan
Year: 2011
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

We report high concentrations of black carbon aerosols (BC), present at two rural sites in New York during the last week in May 2010, that are linked to wildfire activity. At Mayville BC from wood smoke was recorded for a total of 20 h from three...

Person: Dutkiewicz, Husain, Roychowdhury, Demerjian
Year: 2011
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Welcome to the new era of 'megafires,' which rage with such intensity that no human force can put them out. Their main causes, climate change and fire suppression, are fueling a heated debate about how to stop them....

Person: Glick
Year: 2011
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

The boreal biome is characterised by extensive wildfires that frequently burn into the thick organic soils found in many forests and wetlands. Previous studies investigating surface fuel consumption generally have not accounted for variation in the...

Person: Benscoter, Thompson, Waddington, Flannigan, Wotton, de Groot, Turetsky
Year: 2011
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

As climate change increases vegetation combustibility, humans are impacted by wildfires through loss of lives and property, leading to an increased emphasis on prescribed burning practices to reduce hazards. A key and pervading concept accepted by most...

Person: Bradshaw, Dixon, Hopper, Lambers, Turner
Year: 2011
Type: Document
Source: TTRS