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The Minimum Acceptable Visibility (MAV) table was originally provided by the California Highway Patrol in response to an inquiry  relative to acceptable highway visibility reduction caused by smoke. The table was included in chapter two of the 1991...

Person:
Year: 1991
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

[From the text] In the southeastern United States, the native biota of many natural ecosystems are adapted to periodic burning. It is generally believed that in Florida at the time of European intervention, these ecosystems were sustained as fire...

Person: Nodvin, Waldrop, Shinn
Year: 1991
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

In 1985, Yosemite began using a geographic information system for fire management and research. The system has been used to compare historic fire incidence over a range of topography and vegetation types. Parkwide fuel inventories and prescribed burn...

Person: Nodvin, Waldrop, van Wagtendonk
Year: 1991
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

n this chapter we describe the results of airborne studies of smokes from 17 biomass fuel fires, including 14 prescribed fires and 3 wildfires, burned primarily in the temperate zone of North America between 34° and 49°N latitude. The prescribed...

Person: Levine, Radke, Hegg, Hobbs, Nance, Lyons, Laursen, Weiss, Riggan, Ward
Year: 1991
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

The present volume discusses the biomass burning (BMB) studies of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry project, GEO satellite estimation of Amazonian BMB, remote sensing of BMB in West Africa with NOAA-AVHRR, an orbital view of the great...

Person: Levine
Year: 1991
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Planning prescribed fires for optimal periods which results in emissions reduction is an extremely useful air quality management technique. New information suggests that one more useful tool in smoke management may involve using the capacity of the...

Person: Radke, Ward
Year: 1991
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Due to the increasing concern about global climate change and the realization that biomass fires are a significant source of CO2, CH4, and other greenhouse gases, there is a need to quantify the emissions of these gases from biomass fires. The...

Person: Olbu, Susott, Ward
Year: 1991
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

This work introduces remote sensing of biomass burning emissions using high-resolution Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectroscopy over open paths in smoke plumes from biomass fires. There are several advantages to this type of smoke...

Person: Levine, Griffith, Mankin, Coffey, Ward, Riebau
Year: 1991
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Agricultural practices and land use modification were estimated to produce 14% and 9%, respectively, of the total greenhouse gas emissions contributing to global warming in the decade preceding 1990 (Marshall, 1989). Carbon release rates from tropical...

Person: Levine, Jenkins, Turn, Williams, Chang, Raabe, Paskind, Teague
Year: 1991
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Today biomass burning is accepted to be an important source of many trace gases affecting atmospheric chemistry (Crutzen et al., 1979; Cofer et al., 1988a; Radke et al., 1988; Crutzen et al., 1990). Despite its global significance and in contrast to...

Person: Levine, Lobert, Scharffe, Hao, Kuhlbusch, Seuwan, Warneck, Crutzen
Year: 1991
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES