Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 785

This agreement is made and entered into by the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Joint Fire Science Program (BLM), and the University of Nevada Reno for the purpose of Evaluating the Effectiveness of the Joint Fire Science Program...

Person: Singletary, Evans
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Project
Source: FRAMES

Prescribed fire and wildfire in the Western US have long been critical ecological processes used by humans, specifically Native Americans, to manage the plant species, insects, and diseases present in a landscape. However, policies of fire suppression...

Person: Lopez, Frederick, Navarro
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Common practices for invasive species control and management include physical, chemical, and biological approaches. The first two approaches have clear limitations and may lead to unintended (negative) consequences, unless carefully planned and...

Person: Guo, Brockway, Larson, Wang, Ren
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The incidence and degree of stand disturbance (that is, from fre, insects, and disease) are driving excess tree mortality in the Western United States. Hot and dry conditions associated with drought have stressed forests over a wide geographic area,...

Person: Briggs
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fire season has arrived on the Ponderosa Pine National Forest, but this year is different. After working with the Wildfire Risk Management Team at RMRS, they understand risks better. They use detailed data and analysis to complement years of experience...

Person:
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Modern wildland fire management effectively began in the aftermath of the Great Fires of 1910. The Big Blowup traumatized the fledgling Forest Service and its Chiefs for decades. One of the aftershocks, the 1911 Weeks Act, established the basis for a...

Person: Pyne
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Presented by Randi Jandt and Jill Johnstone. From the 2018 Bonanza Creek LTER symposium, April 6, 2018.

Person: Jandt, Johnstone
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Contemporary climate change in Alaska has resulted in amplified rates of press and pulse disturbances that drive ecosystem change with significant consequences for socio‐environmental systems. Despite the vulnerability of Arctic and boreal landscapes...

Person: Pastick, Jorgenson, Goetz, Jones, Wylie, Minsley, Genet, Knight, Swanson, Jorgenson
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

From the Spring 2017 AFSC Remote Sensing Workshop: Opportunities to Apply Remote Sensing in Boreal/Arctic Wildfire Management and Science.

Person: Loehman, Saperstein, Miller, Hrobak, Loboda, Veraverbeke, Hoy
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

From the Spring 2017 AFSC Remote Sensing Workshop: Opportunities to Apply Remote Sensing in Boreal/Arctic Wildfire Management and Science.

Person: Miller
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES