Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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From the Summary (p.343-344) ... 'Radar imagery is an important source of data for monitoring specific processes and surface characteristics in boreal forests. As with other sources of remotely sensed data, radar imagery can efficiently provide...

Person: Kasischke, Stocks, Kasischke, BourgeauChavez, French, Harrell
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Stroppiana, Pinnock, Gregoire
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In 1992 the Greater Vancouver Water District began an extensive ecological inventory of its three watersheds (53,600 ha) that serve as the drinking water source for the Greater Vancouver Region. The focus of the inventory, which integrates physical and...

Person: Neuenschwander, Ryan, Gollberg, Blackwell, Green, Hedberg, Ohlson
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fuel input layers for the FARSITE fire growth model were created for all lands in and around the Gila National Forest, New Mexico, using satellite imagery, terrain modeling, and biophysical simulation. FARSITE is a spatially explicit fire growth model...

Person: Neuenschwander, Ryan, Gollberg, Keane, Mincemoyer, Schmidt, Garner
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Understanding the trade-off between short-term and long-term consequences of fire impacts on ecosystems is needed before a comprehensive fuels management program can be implemented nationally. We are comparing three vegetation models that may be used...

Person: Neuenschwander, Ryan, Gollberg, Weise, Kimberlin, Arbaugh, Chew, Jones, Merzenich, van Wagtendonk, Wiitala
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Gorte
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Balice, Koch, Yool
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Knowledge of temporal changes in the area burned by wildfires is required to understand their influence on global climate change. This paper reviews the primary methods of reconstructing and measuring area burned. The area burned by wildfires is...

Person: Innes, Verstraete, Larsen
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildland fire has been an integral part of the conterminous United States' ecological landscape for millennia. Today wildland fire has to compete with other socially desirable goals for a share of a limited air resource. New ozone, particulate,...

Person: Leenhouts
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The wildland fire situation is a question of risk. Risk is in essence the exposure to a chance of loss. However, putting concept of risk into practice is quite complex. Each of the parts of any risk — probability, exposure pathway, and loss value - is...

Person: Cleaves
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS