Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 67

From the text ... 'We do not today countenance or use fire everywhere in the national park system....The National Park Service has the obligation to continue to seek to inform the American people on the significance of fire.' © 1972, Tall...

Person: Hendrickson
Year: 1973
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the Introduction: 'The description of this package is divided into two sections namely, the fuel type boundary section and the terrain contouring section. Each section is divided further into four subsections describing: (a) the procedure for...

Person: Travis, Elsner, Kourtz
Year: 1973
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the introduction:'The Forest Fire Research Institute of the Canadian Forestry Service has on file publications, records, and data covering much of the early forest research undertaken in Canada. This collection, with some publications dating...

Person: Bruce
Year: 1973
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire is essential to the health of many plant and animal communities. nonetheless, Smokey the Bear and his human allies, relying more on pyrophobia than reason, continue to stamp it out indiscriminately.

Person: Vogl
Year: 1973
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Conclusions: 'The results of this study show that black spruce and jack pine can be established successfully by broadcast seeding from the air on fresh to moist sites on a severely burned cutover area in central Newfoundland. The seeding equipment...

Person: Richardson
Year: 1973
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'The ponderosa pine-grassland is characterized by the occurrence and distribution of ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa. It is widely spread covering some 36 million acres from the Fraser River Basin in British Columbia to Durango,...

Person: Biswell
Year: 1973
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus Bonaparte), due to their dependence upon sagebrush-grassland habitat for food and cover, are limited in distribution to the range type dominated by sagebrush, principally big sagebrush (...

Person: Klebenow
Year: 1973
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The suggestion that some forest fires should be allowed or even encouraged to burn in the large national and provincial parks is bound to evoke a wide range of reactions. For decades the forest authorities across Canada have spared no effort to...

Person: Van Wagner
Year: 1973
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Soil moisture measurements are presented for the summer period of 1971 for nine sites spaced inland from the Hudson Bay coastline adjacent to East Pen Island. The sites show a great variation in natural vegetation from a sparsely vegetated young raised...

Person: Rouse, Kershaw
Year: 1973
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

'The Canadian Forest Fire Research Institute recently developed a functionally foolproof rate-of-fire spread timer; it costs about $10 to make.'

Person: Little
Year: 1973
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS