Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 44

Prescribed fire has become a commonly used forest management tool for reducing the occurrence of severe wildfires, decreasing fuel loads and reestablishing the historic ecological influences of fire. Investigating population-level wildlife responses to...

Person: O'donnell, Thompson, Semlitsch
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Climate projections for the Midwestern United States predict southerly climates to shift northward. These shifts in climate could alter distributions of species across North America through changes in climate (i.e., temperature and precipitation), or...

Person: Lebrun, Thogmartin, Thompson, Dijak, Millspaugh
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Person: Thompson, Dunn, Calkin
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In Canadian forests, the majority of burned area occurs on a small number of days of extreme fire weather. These days lie within the tail end of the distribution of fire weather, and are often the periods when fire suppression capacity is most...

Person: Wang, Thompson, Marshall, Tymstra, Carr, Flannigan
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Perpetual conservation easements (CEs) are popular for restricting development and land use, but their fixed terms create challenges for adaptation to climate change. The increasing pace of environmental and social change demands adaptive conservation...

Person: Rissman, Owley, Shaw, Thompson
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildfire activity in the United States incurs substantial costs and losses, and presents challenges to federal, state, tribal and local agencies that have responsibility for wildfire management. Beyond the potential socioeconomic and ecological losses...

Person: Calkin, Stonesifer, Thompson, McHugh
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Wildfire represents the single largest disturbance to the ecohydrological function of northern peatlands. Alterations to peatland thermal behavior as a result of wildfire will modify the carbon balance of these important long-term global carbon stores...

Person: Kettridge, Thompson, Waddington
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Reduced firefighter exposure to unnecessary risk during fire incidents continues to guide fire management decisions and anchors our actions.'

Person: Calkin, Phipps, Holmes, Rieck, Thompson
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In this paper we review progress towards the implementation of a risk management framework for US federal wildland fire policy and operations. We first describe new developments in wildfire simulation technology that catalyzed the development of risk-...

Person: Calkin, Finney, Ager, Thompson, Gebert
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The spatial, temporal, and social dimensions of wildfire risk are challenging U.S. federal land management agencies to meet societal needs while maintaining the health of the lands they manage. In this paper we present a quantitative, geospatial...

Person: Thompson, Calkin, Finney, Ager, Gilbertson-Day
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS