Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Human-caused forest fires are a serious problem throughout the world. Believing that there are predictable characteristics common to all fires, we analyzed the historical human-caused fire occurrence data for the Whitecourt Provincial Forest of Alberta...

Person: Vega-Garcia, Lee, Woodard, Titus
Year: 1996
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

An interactive microcomputer environment, the Forester's Workspace, is introduced and used to illustrate the estimation of residual fuel biomass for lodgepole pine and white spruce trees and stands in Alberta. Estimates are made for individual...

Person: Titus, Adams, Woodard
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Ground fuels in aspen forests of central Alberta even after considerable periods of dry weather are moist and do not easily ignite, nor sustain combustion. It was hypothesized that low flammability of aspen ground fuels is significantly affected by...

Person: Rothwell, Woodard, Samran
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A commonly available plastic garden-type soaker hose was tested in a 'series' configuration to determine the suitability of using this hose type to contain wildland fires. The bursting strength was determined for three hose-types (the RCR-...

Person: Kanjanakunchorn, Woodard, McDonald
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Hot-spotting containment rates were determined for 18 fires of various intensities in two common boreal forest cover types: 8 in jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) and 10 in black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.). Hot-spotting containment rates did...

Person: Murphy, Woodard, Quintilio, Titus
Year: 1991
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS