Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 23

Intensifying wildfire activity and climate change can drive rapid forest compositional shifts. In boreal North America, black spruce shapes forest flammability and depends on fire for regeneration. This relationship has helped black spruce maintain its...

Person: Baltzer, Day, Walker, Greene, Mack, Alexander, Arseneault, Barnes, Bergeron, Boucher, Bourgeau-Chavez, Brown, Carrière, Howard, Gauthier, Parisien, Reid, Rogers, Roland, Sirois, Stehn, Thompson, Turetsky, Veraverbeke, Whitman, Yang, Johnstone
Year: 2021
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildfires emit large quantities of particles that affect Earth’s climate and human health. Black carbon (BC), commonly known as soot, is directly emitted to the atmosphere by wildfires and other processes and can be transported and deposited in remote...

Person: Sierra-Hernández, Beaudon, Porter, Mosley-Thompson, Thompson
Year: 2022
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Climate change is a pervasive and growing global threat to biodiversity and ecosystems. Here, we present the most up-to-date assessment of climate change impacts on biodiversity, ecosystems, and ecosystem services in the U.S. and implications for...

Person: Weiskopf, Rubenstein, Crozier, Gaichas, Griffis, Halofsky, Hyde, Morelli, Morisette, Muñoz, Pershing, Peterson, Poudel, Staudinger, Sutton-Grier, Thompson, Vose, Weltzin, Whyte
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

In 2015, researchers from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Human Dimensions Program (hereafter U.S. Forest Service), and the University of Córdoba, Forest Engineering Department, Forest Fire Laboratory...

Person: Rodríguez y Silva, Molina Martínez, Thompson, O'Connor
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildland fire management is subject to manifold sources of uncertainty. Beyond the unpredictability of wildfire behavior, uncertainty stems from inaccurate/missing data, limited resource value measures to guide prioritization across fires and resources...

Person: Thompson, Calkin
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The Landscape Fire and Resource Management Planning Tools (LANDFIRE) Project is mapping wildland fuels, vegetation, and fire regime characteristics across the United States. The LANDFIRE project is unique because of its national scope, creating an...

Person: Reeves, Ryan, Rollins, Thompson
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The predicted increase in climate warming will have profound impacts on forest ecosystems and landscapes in Canada because of increased temperature, and altered disturbance regimes. Climate change is predicted to be variable within Canada, and to cause...

Person: Thompson, Flannigan, Wotton, Suffling
Year: 1998
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Thompson, Simard, Titman
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text...'Obviously, there are many ways to categorize plants and animals that people are concerned about. For this chapter, the Terrestrial Team focused on the categories public land managers typically must address as part of their...

Person: Thompson, Zollner, Bukenhofer, Hensley, Houf
Year: 1999
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) does not regenerate well in the absence of fire, or without mechanical exposure of mineral soil, while balsam fir (Abies balsamea L. Mill.) is a common understory species on sites occupied by white pine. We...

Person: Duchesne, Herr, Wetzel, Thompson, Reader
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS