Fire and Archaeology

Displaying 1 - 10 of 34

The intersection of expanding human development and wildland landscapes—the “wildland–urban interface” or WUI—is one of the most vexing contexts for fire management because it involves complex interacting systems of people and nature. Here, we document...

Person: Roos, Swetnam, Ferguson, Liebmann, Loehman, Welch, Margolis, Guiterman, Hockaday, Aiuvalasit, Battillo, Farella, Kiahtipes
Year: 2021
Type: Document

Here, we show that the last century of fire suppression in the western U.S. has resulted in fire intensities that are unique over more than 900 years of record in ponderosa pine forests (Pinus ponderosa). Specifically, we use the heat-sensitive...

Person: Roos, Rittenour, Swetnam, Loehman, Hollenback, Liebmann, Rosenstein
Year: 2020
Type: Document

An increasingly accepted paradigm in conservation attributes valued modern ecological conditions to past human activities. Disturbances, including prescribed fire, are therefore used by land managers to impede forest development in many potentially...

Person: Oswald, Foster, Shuman, Chilton, Doucette, Duranleau
Year: 2020
Type: Document

The complex interactions among climate, soils, fire and humans in the biogeography of natural grasslands has long been debated in Australia. On the one hand, ecological models assume the primacy of climate and soils. On the other, Aboriginal burning is...

Person: Foreman
Year: 2016
Type: Document

Globally, colonialism resulted in the suppression of aboriginal land management practices, abetted by the concept of terra nullius, 'belonging to no one'; the belief that aboriginal people had little influence on or ownership of the land....

Person: Pellatt, Gedalof
Year: 2014
Type: Document

Prescribed burning is increasingly being used in the deciduous forests of eastern North America. Recent work suggests that historical fire frequency has been overestimated east of the prairie-woodland transition zone, and its introduction could...

Person: Matlack
Year: 2013
Type: Document

Prescribed burning is increasingly being used in the deciduous forests of eastern North America. Recent work suggests that historical fire frequency has been overestimated east of the prairie-woodland transition zone, and its introduction could...

Person: Matlack
Year: 2013
Type: Document

This study brought together a team of ecologists, archaeologists, environmental historians, indigenous peoples, and land managers within a research framework combining an ethnographic investigation of traditional practices with cutting-edge...

Person: Johnson
Year: 2013
Type: Document

This webinar will provide an introduction to the new edition of the Rainbow series that provides fire and land management professionals and policy makers with a greater understanding of the value of cultural resource protection and the methods...

Person: Ryan
Year: 2012
Type: Media

This state-of-knowledge review provides a synthesis of the effects of fire on cultural resources, which can be used by fire managers, cultural resource (CR) specialists, and archaeologists to more effectively manage wildland vegetation, fuels, and fire...

Person: Ryan, Jones, Koerner, Lee
Year: 2012
Type: Document