Fire and Archaeology

Displaying 1 - 10 of 22

Motivation: Rapid climate change is altering plant communities around the globe fundamentally. Despite progress in understanding how plants respond to these climate shifts, accumulating evidence suggests that disturbance could not only modify expected...

Person: Napier, Chipman
Year: 2022
Type: Document

Humans have influenced global fire activity for millennia and will continue to do so into the future. Given the long-term interaction between humans and fire, we propose a collaborative research agenda linking archaeology and fire science that...

Person: Snitker, Roos, Sullivan, Maezumi, Bird, Coughlan, Derr, Gassaway, Klimaszewski-Patterson, Loehman
Year: 2022
Type: Document

This webinar will provide an introduction to the new edition of the Rainbow series that provides fire and land management professionals and policy makers with a greater understanding of the value of cultural resource protection and the methods...

Person: Ryan
Year: 2012
Type: Media

This state-of-knowledge review provides a synthesis of the effects of fire on cultural resources, which can be used by fire managers, cultural resource (CR) specialists, and archaeologists to more effectively manage wildland vegetation, fuels, and fire...

Person: Ryan, Jones, Koerner, Lee
Year: 2012
Type: Document

Aim There remains some uncertainty concerning the causes of extinctions of Madagascar's megafauna. One hypothesis is that they were caused by over-hunting by humans. A second hypothesis is that their extinction was caused by both environmental...

Person: Virah-Sawmy, Willis, Gillson
Year: 2010
Type: Document

During the next few decades, a considerable portion of the productive boreal forest in Canada will be harvested and there is an excellent opportunity to use forest management activities (e.g., harvesting, regeneration, stand tending) to alter the...

Person: Engstrom, Galley, de Groot, Hirsch, Kafka, Todd
Year: 2004
Type: Document

Too often, wilderness conservation ignores a temporal perspective greater than the past 50 years, yet a long-term perspective (centuries to millennia) reveals the dynamic nature of many ecosystems. Analysis of fossil pollen, charcoal and stable...

Person: Gillson, Willis
Year: 2004
Type: Document

Mountain quail (Oreortyx pictus) are among the least studied of the North American quails. The prehistoric and early historic distributions of this bird are uncertain. In the Pacific Northwest, mountain quail were first recorded by Lewis and Clark in...

Person: Brennan, Palmer, Burger, Pruden, Crawford
Year: 2000
Type: Document

The rejuvenating effects of natural fires prior to 1900 in Southwestern forest communities have been replaced by recent, unprecedented crownfires. These wildfires have given rise to planned expansion of management fire as a tool for ecosystem...

Person: Bryan, Lissoway
Year: 1997
Type: Document

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Person: Allen, Lissoway
Year: 1996
Type: Document