Fire and Archaeology

Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Treelines are expected to rise to higher elevations with climate warming; the rate and extent however are still largely unknown. Here we present the first multi-proxy palaeoecological study from the treeline in the Northwestern Swiss Alps that covers...

Person: Schwörer, Kaltenrieder, Glur, Berlinger, Elbert, Frei, Gilli, Hafner, Anselmetti, Grosjean, Tinner
Year: 2014
Type: Document

Ali Reiner and Carol Ewell presented a webinar on June 10, 2014. Fire behavior and effects models are frequently used to inform fire and land management decisions despite a lack of testing against field measurements. The Adaptive Management Services...

Person: Reiner, Ewell
Year: 2014
Type: Media

Archaeologists working in the vast coniferous uplands of the American Southwest have commonly assumed that the subsistence economies of the prehistoric peoples who dwelt there focused on corn (Zea mays) agriculture, the erratic yields of which were...

Person: Sullivan, Forste
Year: 2014
Type: Document

Forest/steppe boundaries are among the most dynamic ecosystems on Earth and are highly vulnerable to changes in climate and land use. In this study we examine the postglacial history of the Patagonian forest/steppe ecotone (41-43°S) to better...

Person: Iglesias, Whitlock
Year: 2014
Type: Document

Globally, colonialism resulted in the suppression of aboriginal land management practices, abetted by the concept of terra nullius, 'belonging to no one'; the belief that aboriginal people had little influence on or ownership of the land....

Person: Pellatt, Gedalof
Year: 2014
Type: Document

While still not perfect, advancements in technology have made it possible to gather fire behavior data on actively burning wildland fires (Butler and others 2010, Jimenez and others 2007). The Adaptive Management Services Enterprise Team (AMSET: a...

Person: Vaillant, Ewell, Fites-Kaufman
Year: 2014
Type: Document