Fire and Archaeology

Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Paleofire studies frequently discount the impact of human activities in past fire regimes. Globally, we know that a common pattern of anthropogenic burning regimes is to burn many small patches at high frequency, thereby generating landscape...

Person: Roos, Williamson, Bowman
Year: 2019
Type: Document

Native American populations declined between 1492 and 1900 CE, instigated by the European colonization of the Americas. However, the magnitude, tempo, and ecological effects of this depopulation remain the source of enduring debates. Recently, scholars...

Person: Liebmann, Farella, Roos, Stack, Martini, Swetnam
Year: 2016
Type: Document

Interannual climate variations have been important drivers of wildfire occurrence in ponderosa pine forests across western North America for at least 400 years, but at finer scales of mountain ranges and landscapes human land uses sometimes over-rode...

Person: Swetnam, Farella, Roos, Liebmann, Falk, Allen
Year: 2016
Type: Document

While still not perfect, advancements in technology have made it possible to gather fire behavior data on actively burning wildland fires (Butler and others 2010, Jimenez and others 2007). The Adaptive Management Services Enterprise Team (AMSET: a...

Person: Vaillant, Ewell, Fites-Kaufman
Year: 2014
Type: Document

This state-of-knowledge review provides a synthesis of the effects of fire on cultural resources, which can be used by fire managers, cultural resource (CR) specialists, and archaeologists to more effectively manage wildland vegetation, fuels, and fire...

Person: Ryan, Jones, Koerner, Lee
Year: 2012
Type: Document

This report presents the Phase I results of a joint project between the Office of Archaeological Studies (OAS) of the Museum of New Mexico and the USDA Forest Service (USFS). The objectives of this study were to: 1) Determine whether cultural resources...

Person: Lentz, Gaunt, Willmer
Year: 1996
Type: Document