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The Southwest Fire Science Consortium is partnering with FRAMES to help fire managers access important fire science information related to the Southwest's top ten fire management issues.


Displaying 1 - 10 of 126

Stahl, Andrus, Hicke, Hudak, Bright, Meddens
Remote sensing is widely used to detect forest disturbances (e.g., wildfires, harvest, or outbreaks of pathogens or insects) over spatiotemporal scales that are infeasible to capture with field surveys. To understand forest ecosystem dynamics and…
Year: 2023
Type: Document

Wasserman, Mueller
Background: Increases in fire activity and changes in fire regimes have been documented in recent decades across the western United States. Climate change is expected to continue to exacerbate impacts to forested ecosystems by increasing the…
Year: 2023
Type: Document

Rowe, Lata, Munson, Sinclair
The fire regime of dry desert systems, such as the Sonoran, historically consisted of infrequent, low intensity, size-limited fires. Native grasses and other vegetation, which grow in clumps and patches, are typically not contiguous enough to carry…
Year: 2023
Type: Media

Marsh
Across the southwestern United States, high-severity wildfire is resulting in increasingly large areas of tree mortality, removing the seed sources required for natural regeneration of historically conifer-dominated landscapes. Planting tree…
Year: 2023
Type: Media

Howe, Parks, Harvey, Saberi, Lutz, Yocom
Accurate assessment of burn severity is a critical need for an improved understanding of fire behavior and ecology and effective post-fire management. Although NASA Landsat satellites have a long history of use for remotely sensed mapping of burn…
Year: 2022
Type: Document

Young, Ager, Thode
The long-term outcome from accelerated forest restoration using resource objective wildfire in combination with fuel management on fire-excluded landscapes is not well studied. We used simulation modeling to examine long-term trade-offs and…
Year: 2022
Type: Document

Crockett, Hurteau
Climate change and fire exclusion have increased the flammability of western United States forests, leading to forest cover loss when wildfires occur under severe weather conditions. Increasingly large high-severity burn patches limit natural…
Year: 2022
Type: Document

Donager, Sánchez Meador, Huffman
Context Managers aiming to utilize wildland fire to restore southwestern ponderosa pine landscapes require better understanding of forest cover patterns produced at multiple scales. Restoration effectiveness of wildland fires managed for resource…
Year: 2022
Type: Document

Stevens
The increasing incidence of large wildfires with extensive stand-replacing effects across the southwestern United States is altering the contemporary forest management template within historically frequent-fire conifer forests. While management of…
Year: 2022
Type: Media

Singleton, Thode, Sánchez Meador, Iniguez, Stevens
Context: Spatial patterns of high-severity wildfire in forests affect vegetation recovery pathways, watershed dynamics, and wildlife habitat across landscapes. Yet, less is known about contemporary trends in landscape patterns of high-severity burn…
Year: 2021
Type: Document