Fire Severity and Patch Size

Fire Severity and Patch Size

Displaying 1 - 10 of 98
Climate warming is contributing to increases in wildfire activity throughout the western U.S., leading to potentially long‐lasting shifts in vegetation. The response of forest ecosystems to wildfire is thus a crucial indicator of future vegetation...
Person: Rodman, Veblen, Chapman, Rother, Wion, Redmond
Year: 2020
Type: Document

In western North America, ponderosa pine and dry mixed-conifer forest types appear increasingly vulnerable to wildfire-catalyzed conversion to alternate and non-forest vegetation types. However, unburned or only lightly impacted forest stands that persist...
Person: Coop
Year: 2019
Type: Media

Altered fire regimes can drive major and enduring compositional shifts or losses of forest ecosystems. In western North America, ponderosa pine and dry mixed‐conifer forest types appear increasingly vulnerable to uncharacteristically extensive, high‐...
Person: Coop, DeLory, Downing, Haire, Krawchuk, Miller, Parisien, Walker
Year: 2019
Type: Document

Researchers and managers increasingly recognize enterprise risk management as critical to addressing contemporary fire management challenges. Quantitative wildfire risk assessments contribute by parsing and mapping potentially contradictory positive and...
Person: Dunn, O'Connor, Reilly, Calkin, Thompson
Year: 2019
Type: Document

Tree-ring fire scars, tree ages, historical photographs, and historical surveys indicate that, for centuries, fire played different ecological roles across gradients of elevation, forest, and fire regimes in the Taos Valley Watersheds. Historical fire...
Person: Johnson, Margolis
Year: 2019
Type: Document

Over the past three decades, wildfires in southwestern US ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Lawson & C. Lawson) forests have increased in size and severity. These wildfires can remove large, contiguous patches of mature forests, alter dominant plant...
Person: Owen, Patterson, Gehring, Sieg, Baggett, Fulé
Year: 2019
Type: Document

Globally, the mean abundance of terrestrial animals has fallen by 50% since 1970, and populations face ongoing threats associated with habitat loss, fragmentation, climate change and disturbance. Climate change can influence the quality of remaining...
Person: Sitters, Di Stefano
Year: 2019
Type: Document

Background: Wildfires, like many disturbances, can be catalysts for ecosystem change. Given projected climate change, tree regeneration declines and ecosystem shifts following severe wildfires are predicted. We reviewed scientific literature on post-fire...
Person: Stevens-Rumann, Morgan
Year: 2019
Type: Document

Wildfires in forest ecosystems produce landscape mosaics that include relatively unaffected areas, termed fire refugia. These patches of persistent forest cover can support fire-sensitive species and the biotic legacies important for post-fire forest...
Person: Walker, Coop, Downing, Krawchuk, Malone, Meigs
Year: 2019
Type: Document

The distribution, transport, and accumulation of wildfire‐generated pyrogenic carbon (PyC) has important consequences for contaminant transport and carbon cycling, but a conceptual model for PyC accumulation and loss that includes geomorphic processes is...
Person: Galanter, Cadol, Lohse
Year: 2018
Type: Document