Fire and Invasive Species

Fire and Invasive Species

Year

Displaying 1 - 10 of 766
Piñon-juniper vegetation types, including juniper woodland and savannah, piñon-juniper, and piñon woodland, cover approximately 40 million ha in the western United States, where they provide ecosystem services, wildlife habitat, and cultural and aesthetic...
Person: Malcolm, Dykstra, Johnson, Lightfoot, Muldavin, Ramsey
Year: 2020
Type: Document

Over the last several decades in forest and woodland ecosystems of the southwestern United States, wildfire size and severity have increased, thereby increasing the vulnerability of these systems to type conversions, invasive species, and other...
Person: Mueller, Thode, Margolis, Yocom, Young, Iniguez
Year: 2020
Type: Document

National guidance is provided for new and updated invasive plant management plans that meet federal standards.
Person: Abella
Year: 2019
Type: Document

Arizona’s Sonoran Desert is home to unique species, sites of immense cultural and historical value, and more than 5 million people. This sensitive region is also threatened by a changing fire regime, spurred by climate change, long-term drought, and...
Person: Aslan, Sandor, Souther
Year: 2019
Type: Media

This report focuses on a mixed-method social science study that engaged stakeholders closely involved with management and conservation efforts across the sagebrush range in order to address the following research objectives:Assess the current state of...
Person: Bennett, Barnwell, Freedman, Smutko, Western
Year: 2019
Type: Document

The coastal temperate rainforests of South and North America are part of the most biomass dense forest biome on the planet. They are also subject to rapid climatic shifts and, subsequently, new disturbance processes - snow loss‐driven mortality and the...
Person: Buma, Batllori, Bisbing, Holz, Saunders, Bidlack, Creutzburg, DellaSala, Gregovich, Hennon, Krapek, Moritz, Zaret
Year: 2019
Type: Document

Plant invasions can affect fuel characteristics, fire behavior, and fire regimes resulting in invasive plant-fire cycles and alternative, self-perpetuating states that can be difficult, if not impossible, to reverse. Concepts related to general resilience...
Person: Chambers, Brooks, Germino, Maestas, Board, Jones, Allred
Year: 2019
Type: Document

The 'Science Framework for Conservation and Restoration of the Sagebrush Biome' is a two-part volume on managing sagebrush ecosystems in the West that was developed by an extensive interagency team of scientists and managers (http://...
Person: Chambers, Crist
Year: 2019
Type: Media

Sagebrush ecosystems are a major component of western U.S. landscapes and they provide vital habitat to a wide array of wildlife species, including greater sage-grouse and pygmy rabbits. However, in recent decades, sagebrush ecosystems have been reduced...
Person: Cooke
Year: 2019
Type: Document

The Science Framework is intended to link the Department of the Interior’s Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy with long-term strategic conservation and restoration actions in the sagebrush biome. The focus is on sagebrush (Artemisia spp...
Person: Crist, Chambers, Phillips, Prentice, Wiechman
Year: 2019
Type: Document