Full Citation: Pierce, Jennifer L.; Meyer, Grant A.; Jull, A. J. Timothy. 2004. Fire-induced erosion and millennial-scale climate change in northern ponderosa pine forests. Nature 432(7013):87-90.
External Identifier(s): 10.1038/nature03058 Digital Object Identifier
Location: South Fork Payette River, Idaho, U.S.; Yellowstone National Park, WY, U.S.
Ecosystem types: Ponderosa pine forest
Southwest FireCLIME Keywords: None
FRAMES Keywords: ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa, Holocene, fire reconstruction, Yellowstone National Park

Fire-induced erosion and millennial-scale climate change in northern ponderosa pine forests

Jennifer L. Pierce, Grant A. Meyer, A. J. Timothy Jull


Summary - what did the authors do and why?

The authors reconstructed long-term fire history of xeric ponderosa pine ecosystems during the Holocene using fire-related sediment deposits in alluvial fans to examine historic climate-fire relationships.


Publication findings:

The authors found that during historically cooler periods, forests burned frequently at low severity, which they suggest was driven by increases in understory vegetation growth. Historically warm periods were linked to severe drought and an increase in high severity fires that caused large debris-flow events and fire-related erosion.

Climate and Fire Linkages

The authors found that during historically cooler periods, forests burned frequently at low severity, which they suggest was driven by increases in understory vegetation growth. Historically warm periods were linked to severe drought and an increase in high severity fires that caused large debris-flow events and fire-related erosion.

The authors found that during historically cooler periods, forests burned frequently at low severity, which they suggest was driven by increases in understory vegetation growth. Historically warm periods were linked to severe drought and an increase in high severity fires that caused large debris-flow events and fire-related erosion.

The authors found that during historically cooler periods, forests burned frequently at low severity, which they suggest was driven by increases in understory vegetation growth. Historically warm periods were linked to severe drought and an increase in high severity fires that caused large debris-flow events and fire-related erosion.