Full Citation: Honig, Kristen A.; Fulé, Peter Z. 2012. Simulating effects of climate change and ecological restoration on fire behaviour in a south-western USA ponderosa pine forest. International Journal of Wildland Fire 21(6):731-742.
External Identifier(s): 10.1071/WF11082 Digital Object Identifier
Location: Kaibab National Forest, Arizona, U.S.
Ecosystem types: Ponderosa pine forest
Southwest FireCLIME Keywords: None
FRAMES Keywords: crown fires, fire frequency, flame length, fuel moisture, rate of spread, surface fires, wildfires, climate change, greenhouse gases, national forests, statistical analysis, thinning, wind, Pinus ponderosa, ponderosa pine, Arizona, fire management, forest management, coniferous forests, diameter caps, general circulation models, greenhouse gas emission scenarios, Kaibab National Forest, wildfire, greenhouse gas emissions

Simulating effects of climate change and ecological restoration on fire behaviour in a south-western USA ponderosa pine forest

Kristen A. Honig, Peter Z. Fulé


Summary - what did the authors do and why?

The authors simulated future fire behavior and forest structure under two future climate scenarios as well as the potential effects of restoration treatments on a stand in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona, U.S.


Publication findings:

The authors agreed with the consensus that increases in temperature will increase fire activity in the Southwest U.S. by the end of the century. Their results indicated fire intensity may not be significantly greater under the effects of climate change on an individual fire level, however, fire will likely occur more frequently and burn a larger total area.

Climate and Fire Linkages

The authors agreed with the consensus that increases in temperature will increase fire activity in the Southwest U.S. by the end of the century. Their results indicated fire intensity may not be significantly greater under the effects of climate change on an individual fire level, however, fire will likely occur more frequently and burn a larger total area.

The authors agreed with the consensus that increases in temperature will increase fire activity in the Southwest U.S. by the end of the century. Their results indicated fire intensity may not be significantly greater under the effects of climate change on an individual fire level, however, fire will likely occur more frequently and burn a larger total area.

The authors agreed with the consensus that increases in temperature will increase fire activity in the Southwest U.S. by the end of the century. Their results indicated fire intensity may not be significantly greater under the effects of climate change on an individual fire level, however, fire will likely occur more frequently and burn a larger total area.