Full Citation: Roccaforte, John P.; Fulé, Peter Z.; Covington, W. Wallace. 2008. Landscape-scale changes in canopy fuels and potential fire behaviour following ponderosa pine restoration treatments. International Journal of Wildland Fire 17(2):293-303.
External Identifier(s): 10.1071/WF06120 Digital Object Identifier
Location: Mt. Trumbull, Arizona, U.S.
Ecosystem types: Ponderosa pine ecosystem
Southwest FireCLIME Keywords: Windspeed, treatments
FRAMES Keywords: Arizona, coniferous forests, crown fires, fire management, forest management, fuel loading, fuel management, Juniperus osteosperma, overstory, Pinus edulis, Pinus ponderosa, population density, Quercus gambelii, Robinia neomexicana, size classes, slash, statistical analysis, thinning, wind, CBD - canopy bulk density, canopy fuel load, crown fire, FlamMap, Mt Trumbull, NEXUS

Landscape-scale changes in canopy fuels and potential fire behaviour following ponderosa pine restoration treatments

John Paul Roccaforte, Peter Z. Fulé, W. Wallace Covington


Summary - what did the authors do and why?

The authors evaluated the effects of a landscape-scale restoration treatment of thinning followed by prescribed fire on reducing crown fire hazard potential using FlamMap and NEXUS models with different fuel estimation approaches.


Publication findings:

Prescribed fire treatments reduced the potential for active crown fire compared to the control plots or pretreatment levels. Increases in drought and wind conditions input into either model produced increases in active crown fire, however, the crowning and torching index was two and three times higher, respectively, in areas that had been treated than those with no treatment.

Climate and Fire Linkages

Prescribed fire treatments reduced the potential for active crown fire compared to the control plots or pretreatment levels. Increases in drought and wind conditions input into either model produced increases in active crown fire, however, the crowning and torching index was two and three times higher, respectively, in areas that had been treated than those with no treatment.

Fire and Ecosystem Effects Linkages

Prescribed fire treatments reduced the potential for active crown fire compared to the control plots or pretreatment levels. Increases in drought and wind conditions input into either model produced increases in active crown fire, however, the crowning and torching index was two and three times higher, respectively, in areas that had been treated than those with no treatment.