Full Citation: Allen, Craig D.; Anderson, R. Scott; Jass, Renata B.; Toney, Jaime L.; Baisan, Christopher H. 2008. Paired charcoal and tree-ring records of high-frequency Holocene fire from two New Mexico bog sites. International Journal of Wildland Fire 17(1):115-130.
External Identifier(s): 10.1071/WF07165 Digital Object Identifier
Location: Chihuahueños and Alamo bogs, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico, U.S.
Ecosystem types: Mixed-conifer ecosystem
Southwest FireCLIME Keywords: None
FRAMES Keywords: bogs, charcoal, conifers, dendrochronology, fire frequency, fire management, fire regimes, fire scar analysis, histories, lakes, New Mexico, paleoecology, rate of spread, season of fire, sedimentation, surface fires, trees, watershed management, watersheds, wetlands, wildfires, Alamo Bog, CHAPS, Chihuahuenos Bog, fire scars, Jemez Mountains, replicated charcoal records

Paired charcoal and tree-ring records of high-frequency Holocene fire from two New Mexico bog sites

Craig D. Allen, R. Scott Anderson, R. B. Jass, Jaime L. Toney, Christopher H. Baisan


Summary - what did the authors do and why?

This article aims to reconstruct historical fire histories and fire-climate relationships extending back approximately 15,000 years by sampling from charcoal cores in medium-elevation bog sites.


Publication findings:

Charcoal concentration in the sediment records at both bogs varied considerably over 15,000 years suggesting that climate affected both vegetation and fire regimes. Around approximately 8,000 years before present, sharp increases in charcoal concentrations indicate increased warming, however, the authors were unable to interpret the fire history due to confounding factors, specifically the low sedimentation rate during these periods. Still, at the both bog sites, a departure in superposed epoch analysis PDSI of -2, indicating very dry conditions, coincided with widespread fire years between the 1500’s and early 1900’s.

Climate and Fire Linkages

Charcoal concentration in the sediment records at both bogs varied considerably over 15,000 years suggesting that climate affected both vegetation and fire regimes. At the both bog sites, a departure in superposed epoch analysis PDSI of -2, indicating very dry conditions, coincided with widespread fire years between the 1500’s and early 1900’s.

Charcoal concentration in the sediment records at both bogs varied considerably over 15,000 years suggesting that climate affected both vegetation and fire regimes. Around approximately 8,000 years before present, sharp increases in charcoal concentrations indicate increased warming, however, the authors were unable to interpret the fire history due to confounding factors, specifically the low sedimentation rate during these periods.