Full Citation: Moore, Margaret M., and David W. Huffman. 2004. Tree encroachment on meadows of the North Rim, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, USA. Arctic Antarctic and Alpine Research, v. 36, no. 4, p. 474-483.
External Identifier(s): 10.1657/1523-0430(2004)036[0474:TEOMOT]2.0.CO;2 Digital Object Identifier
Location: Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, U.S.
Ecosystem types: Montane meadow; subalpine grassland
Southwest FireCLIME Keywords: None
FRAMES Keywords: Abies concolor, Abies lasiocarpa, age classes, Arizona, coniferous forests, cover type conversion, ecosystem dynamics, ecotones, European settlement, fire dependent species, fire frequency, fire regimes, forest management, grasslands, histories, invasive species, land use, landscape ecology, low intensity burns, national parks, Picea pungens, Pinus ponderosa, population density, Populus tremuloides, seedlings, statistical analysis, succession, topography, meadows, SUBALPINE GRASSLANDS, TREE ESTABLISHMENT PATTERNS

Tree encroachment on meadows of the North Rim, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, USA

Margaret M. Moore, David W. Huffman


Summary - what did the authors do and why?

The authors described the species composition, structure, and temporal patterns of tree encroachment in alpine meadow and grassland ecosystems on the North Rim of the Grand Canyon to inform management on conservation of meadow habitat.


Publication findings:

Although the authors did not examine the causal features of tree encroachment into meadows, a disruption in the fire regime beginning in the late 1870s and early 1880s coincided with the establishment of ponderosa pine, spruce, and aspen stands near and within some meadow sites.

Fire and Ecosystem Effects Linkages

Although the authors did not examine the causal features of tree encroachment into meadows, a disruption in the fire regime beginning in the late 1870s and early 1880s coincided with the establishment of ponderosa pine, spruce, and aspen stands near and within some meadow sites.