Full Citation: Rother, Monica T.; Veblen, Thomas T.; Furman, Luke G. 2015. A field experiment informs expected patterns of conifer regeneration after disturbance under changing climate conditions. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 45(11):1607-1616.
External Identifier(s): 10.1139/cjfr-2015-0033 Digital Object Identifier
Location: Colorado Front Range; Heil Valley Ranch Open Space, Boulder County, Colorado, U.S.
Ecosystem types: Ponderosa pine
Southwest FireCLIME Keywords: None
FRAMES Keywords: Pinus ponderosa, ponderosa pine, vegetation, climate change, Colorado, tree regeneration, field experiment, open-top chambers, air temperature, conifers, elevation, humidity, coniferous forest, seedlings, soil temperature, fire management, forest management, Pseudotsuga menziesii, Douglas-fir

A field experiment informs expected patterns of conifer regeneration after disturbance under changing climate conditions

Monica T. Rother, Thomas T. Veblen, Luke G. Furman


Summary - what did the authors do and why?

The authors implemented field experiments to determine the effects of an array of temperature and moisture treatments on ponderosa pine regeneration following disturbance, such as wildfire.


Publication findings:

The authors found that regeneration in the warmed and dry plots had the lowest growth rates and percent survival of seedlings. The authors suggest that increased temperatures and droughty conditions are likely to inhibit recruitment and seedling survival post-fire or other large-scale, rapid disturbance, potentially leading to new or novel vegetation assemblages.

Fire and Ecosystem Effects Linkages

The authors found that regeneration in the warmed and dry plots had the lowest growth rates and percent survival of seedlings. The authors suggest that increased temperatures and droughty conditions are likely to inhibit recruitment and seedling survival post-fire or other large-scale, rapid disturbance, potentially leading to new or novel vegetation assemblages.