Full Citation: Jolly, W. Matt; Cochrane, Mark A.; Freeborn, Patrick H.; Holden, Zachary A.; Brown, Timothy J.; Williamson, Grant J.; Bowman, David M. J. S. 2015. Climate-induced variations in global wildfire danger from 1979 to 2013. Nature Communications 6:7537.
External Identifier(s): 10.1038/ncomms8537 Digital Object Identifier
Location: Global
Ecosystem types: Vegetated surfaces
Southwest FireCLIME Keywords: None
FRAMES Keywords: fire weather, fire season, wildfire danger, global wildfire activity, fire danger rating, fire frequency, season of fire, wildfires, climatology, fire management

Climate-induced variations in global wildfire danger from 1979 to 2013

W. Matt Jolly, Mark A. Cochrane, Patrick H. Freeborn, Zachary A. Holden, Tim J. Brown, Grant J. Williamson, David M. J. S. Bowman


Summary - what did the authors do and why?

The authors assessed global trends in fire weather season length.


Publication findings:

The authors found that fire season length has significantly increased across approximately 25% of the Earth’s vegetated area resulting in a doubling of the global burnable area. Areas with the greatest increase in fire season length occurred where there were the greatest changes in especially temperature, but also humidity, length of rain-free periods, and wind speeds.

Climate and Fire Linkages

The authors found that fire season length has significantly increased across approximately 25% of the Earth’s vegetated area resulting in a doubling of the global burnable area. Areas with the greatest increase in fire season length occurred where there were the greatest changes in especially temperature, but also humidity, length of rain-free periods, and wind speeds.

The authors found that fire season length has significantly increased across approximately 25% of the Earth’s vegetated area resulting in a doubling of the global burnable area. Areas with the greatest increase in fire season length occurred where there were the greatest changes in especially temperature, but also humidity, length of rain-free periods, and wind speeds.

The authors found that fire season length has significantly increased across approximately 25% of the Earth’s vegetated area resulting in a doubling of the global burnable area. Areas with the greatest increase in fire season length occurred where there were the greatest changes in especially temperature, but also humidity, length of rain-free periods, and wind speeds.