Full Citation: Donnegan, Joseph A.; Veblen, Thomas T.; Sibold, Jason S. 2001. Climatic and human influences on fire history in Pike National Forest, central Colorado. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 31(9):1526-1539.
External Identifier(s): 10.1139/x01-093 Digital Object Identifier
Location: Pike National Forest, Colorado, U.S.
Ecosystem types: Forested ecosystems; gradient; Ponderosa pine forest
Southwest FireCLIME Keywords: None
FRAMES Keywords: ENSO - El Nino Southern Oscillation, fire regimes, land use, climatic influence, Colorado, Pike National Forest, fire-scar records, Abies lasiocarpa, climatology, coniferous forests, dendrochronology, ecosystem dynamics, elevation, fire frequency, fire injuries (plants), fire management, fire scar analysis, fire size, fire suppression, forest management, histories, Juniperus scopulorum, logging, moisture, national forests, pine forests, Pinus aristata, Pinus contorta, Pinus engelmannii, Pinus flexilis, plant growth, Pinus ponderosa, ponderosa pine, Populus tremuloides, presettlement fires, Douglas-fir, Pseudotsuga menziesii, sampling, statistical analysis, understory vegetation, vegetation surveys, wildfires

Climatic and human influences on fire history in Pike National Forest, central Colorado

Joseph A. Donnegan, Thomas T. Veblen, Jason S. Sibold


Summary - what did the authors do and why?

The authors examined historic relationships between interannual and multidecadal climate variability, specifically moisture variability, and fire regimes as well as the effects of changes in human land-use practices.


Publication findings:

The authors found that fire activity was strongly related to interannual drought conditions typically associated with cycles of ENSO. Increased fire activity tends to occur during the La Niña cycle, in years of reduced moisture availability and were often followed 2-4 years of increased moisture availability, associated with El Niño years.

Climate and Fire Linkages

The authors found that fire activity was strongly related to interannual drought conditions typically associated with cycles of ENSO. Increased fire activity tends to occur during the La Niña cycle, in years of reduced moisture availability and were often followed 2-4 years of increased moisture availability, associated with El Niño years.