Full Citation: Huffman, David W.; Fulé, Peter Z.; Pearson, Kristen M.; Crouse, Joseph E. 2008. Fire history of pinyon-juniper woodlands at upper ecotones with ponderosa pine forests in Arizona and New Mexico. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 38(8):2097-2108.
External Identifier(s): 10.1139/X08-053 Digital Object Identifier
Location: Tusayan Ranger District, Kaibab national Forest, Arizona, U.S.; La Mesa de Las Viejas, New Mexico, U.S.
Ecosystem types: Pinyon-juniper woodlands; Ponderosa pine forest
Southwest FireCLIME Keywords: None
FRAMES Keywords: dendrochronology, fire scars, Pinus ponderosa, ponderosa pine, forest age structure, Juniperus osteosperma, Pinus edulis, pinyon pine, Juniperus scopulorum, pinon-juniper woodland, age classes, Arizona, Artemisia tridentata, char, coniferous forests, diameter classes, distribution, ecotones, fire frequency, fire injuries (plants), fire management, fire regimes, fire scar analysis, forest management, GIS - geographic information system, Juniperus, Juniperus monosperma, national forests, New Mexico, overstory, pine forests, Pinus, Purshia, Quercus gambelii, stand characteristics, statistical analysis, surface fires, trees, vegetation surveys, wildfires

Fire history of pinyon-juniper woodlands at upper ecotones with ponderosa pine forests in Arizona and New Mexico

David W. Huffman, Peter Z. Fulé, Kristen M. Pearson, Joseph E. Crouse


Summary - what did the authors do and why?

The authors reconstructed the historical fire regime using dendrochronological and forest structure analysis techniques along the ecotonal boundary of pinyon-juniper woodlands and ponderosa pine forest.


Publication findings:

The authors found that fires within the ponderosa pine stands did not spread to the adjacent pinyon-juniper woodland. Historically, fire in pinyon-juniper was typically severe and stand-replacing, but limited in size with fire return intervals of 300 to 400 years. This has resulted in numerous small patches of same-aged pinyon stands.

Fire and Ecosystem Effects Linkages

The authors found that fires within the ponderosa pine stands did not spread to the adjacent pinyon-juniper woodland. Historically, fire in pinyon-juniper was typically severe and stand-replacing, but limited in size with fire return intervals of 300 to 400 years. This has resulted in numerous small patches of same-aged pinyon stands.

The authors found that fires within the ponderosa pine stands did not spread to the adjacent pinyon-juniper woodland. Historically, fire in pinyon-juniper was typically severe and stand-replacing, but limited in size with fire return intervals of 300 to 400 years. This has resulted in numerous small patches of same-aged pinyon stands.

The authors found that fires within the ponderosa pine stands did not spread to the adjacent pinyon-juniper woodland. Historically, fire in pinyon-juniper was typically severe and stand-replacing, but limited in size with fire return intervals of 300 to 400 years. This has resulted in numerous small patches of same-aged pinyon stands.