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Citation: Vankat, John L. 2011. Post-1935 changes in forest vegetation of Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, USA: Part 2 - mixed conifer, spruce-fir, and quaking aspen forests. Forest Ecology and Management 261(3):326-341.

Summary:

The author resampled vegetation study plots originally sampled in Grand Canyon National Park in 1935 to document changes in forest structure and composition.



Citation: Haire, Sandra L.; McGarigal, Kevin. 2010. Effects of landscape patterns of fire severity on regenerating ponderosa pine forests (Pinus ponderosa) in New Mexico and Arizona, USA. Landscape Ecology 25(7):1055-1069.

Summary:

The authors examined how patterns of fire severity at multiple spatial scales affect long-term (30 to 50 years) ponderosa pine regeneration and survivalunder current altered fire regimes. They also considered how subsequent entries of fire influenced seedling survival, as well as biotic and abiotic factors (e.g., topographical and elevational gradients) that affect survival, germination, and growth of ponderosa pine.



Citation: Roccaforte, John P.; Fulé, Peter Z.; Covington, W. Wallace. 2010. Monitoring landscape-scale ponderosa pine restoration treatment implementation and effectiveness. Restoration Ecology 18(6):820-833.

Summary:

The authors evaluate the implementation and effectiveness of a thinning and burning forest restoration treatment to meet forest structure objectives in a ponderosa pine forest.



Citation: Holden, Zachary A.; Morgan, Penelope; Evans, Jeffrey S. 2009. A predictive model of burn severity based on 20-year satellite-inferred burn severity data in a large southwestern US wilderness area. Forest Ecology and Management 258(11):2399-2406.

Summary:

The authors used the Random Forest algorithm in R to analyze the comparative strength of a suite of topographic variables and Potential Vegetation Type (PVT) to predict high severity fire occurrence from 1984 to 2004 in the Gila Wilderness.



Citation: Holden, Zachary A.; Morgan, Penelope; Hudak, Andrew T. 2010. Burn severity of areas reburned by wildfires in the Gila National Forest, New Mexico, USA. Fire Ecology 6(3):77-85.

Summary:

The authors analyzed the effects of the severity of a fire on the severity of a subsequent reburn based on the vegetation type. The analysis was stratified by vegetation types that burned frequently historically, including piñyon-juniper woodlands, ponderosa pine dominated forests, mixed-conifer, and spruce-fir.



Citation: Allen, Craig D.; Macalady, Alison K.; Chenchouni, Haroun; Bachelet, Dominique; McDowell, Nate G.; Vennetier, Michel; Kitzberger, Thomas; Rigling, Andreas; Breshears, David D.; Hogg, Edward H.; Gonzalez, Patrick; Fensham, Roderick J.; Zhang, Zhen; Castro, Jorge; Demidova, Natalia; Lim, Jong-Hwan; Allard, Gillian; Running, Steven W.; Semerci, Akkin; Cobb, Neil S. 2010. A global overview of drought and heat-induced tree mortality reveals emerging climate change risks for forests. Forest Ecology and Management 259(4):660-684.

Summary:

This article was a review of literature regarding tree mortality due to water stress and increased temperatures as a result of climate change in forests around the world.



Citation: van Mantgem, Phillip J.; Stephenson, Nathan L.; Byrne, John C.; Daniels, Lori D.; Franklin, Jerry F.; Fulé, Peter Z.; Harmon, Mark E.; Larson, Andrew J.; Smith, Jeremy M.; Taylor, Alan H.; Veblen, Thomas T. 2009. Widespread increase of tree mortality rates in the western United States. Science 323(5913):521-524.

Summary:

The authors assessed the widespread tree mortality that has occurred in coniferous forests in the western U.S. and Canada and identified possible causes of the increased mortality.



Citation: Iniguez, Jose M.; Swetnam, Thomas W.; Baisan, Christopher H. 2009. Spatially and temporally variable fire regime on Rincon Reak, Arizona, USA. Fire Ecology 5(1):3-21.

Summary:


Citation: Abella, Scott R. 2009. Post-fire plant recovery in the Mojave and Sonoran deserts of western north America. Journal of Arid Environments 73(8):699-707.

Summary:

This paper is a systematic review of vegetation recovery in warm deserts post-fire. The authors evaluated post-fire species composition based on time-since-fire and each desert, post-fire sprouting frequency, and perennial plant cover establishment.



Citation: Fulé, Peter Z.; Korb, Julie E.; Wu, Rosalind. 2009. Changes in forest structure of a mixed conifer forest, southwestern Colorado, USA. Forest Ecology and Management 258(7):1200-1210.

Summary:

The authors reconstructed the historical fire regime and stand structure of a mixed-conifer forest in southwestern Colorado to determine how stand structure and composition have changed over time.