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Displaying 101 - 109 of 109

Citation: Weng, Chengyu; Jackson, Stephen T. 1999. Late Glacial and Holocene vegetation history and paleoclimate of the Kaibab Plateau, Arizona. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 153(1-4):179-201.

Summary:

The authors reconstructed fire history since the Late Glacial based on pollen and plant macrofossil records and sedimentary deposits at two lakes on the Kaibab Plateau and analyzed the relationships between climate, vegetation and fire of the Holocene.



Citation: Mast, Joy Nystrom; Fulé, Peter Z.; Moore, Margaret M.; Covington, W. Wallace; Waltz, Amy E. M. 1999. Restoration of presettlement age structure of an Arizona ponderosa pine forest. Ecological Applications 9(1):228-239.

Summary:

The authors reconstructed historical forest stand structure of a ponderosa pine forest prior to Euro-American settlement and compared pre- and post-historic reference age structure, and they compared forest conditions after restoration treatments were applied to the site.



Citation: Fulé, Peter Z.; Covington, W. Wallace; Moore, Margaret M. 1997. Determining reference conditions for ecosystem management of southwestern ponderosa pine forests. Ecological Applications 7(3):895-908.

Summary:

The authors reconstructed the fire regime and forest structure of a southwestern ponderosa pine forest prior to Euro-American settlement to determine a set of reference conditions as a baseline for ecosystem management.



Citation: Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.; Swetnam, Thomas W. 1997. Multi-century history of wildfire in the ponderosa pine forests of El Malpais National Monument. New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources Bulletin 156:163-171.

Summary:

The authors reconstructed the fire regime and forest structure of a southwestern ponderosa pine forest prior to Euro-American settlement within the unique landscape of the El Malpais National Monument to determine a set of reference conditions as a baseline for ecosystem management.



Citation: Covington, W. W., and M. M. Moore. 1994. Southwestern ponderosa forest structure: changes since Euro-American settlement. Journal of Forestry, v. 92, no. 1, p. 39-47.

Summary:

The authors sampled the structure and composition of a ponderosa pine forest stand along a soil type and topographic gradient to assess changes since Euro-American settlement. The authors also simulated the future trajectory of the stand using ECOSIM through the year 2027.



Citation: Swetnam, Thomas W.; Lynch, Ann M. 1993. Multicentury, regional-scale patterns of western spruce budworm outbreaks. Ecological Monographs 63(4):399-424.

Summary:

The authors reconstructed spruce budworm infestations using tree ring chronologies from the year 1690 to present and examined the potential relationships between historic spruce budworm infestations and human land use changes and climate variation.



Citation: White, M. A., and J. L. Vankat. 1993. Middle and high elevation coniferous forest communities of the North Rim region of Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, USA. Vegetatio, v. 109, p. 161-174.

Summary:

The authors examined the structure and composition of forest stands along environmental gradients in Grand Canyon National Park to classify forest communities and determine what potential changes to structure and composition occurred in these stands following Euro-American settlement.



Citation: Savage, Melissa; Swetnam, Thomas W. 1990. Early 19th-century fire decline following sheep pasturing in a navajo ponderosa pine forest. Ecology 71(6):2374-2378.

Summary:

The authors documented the fire history of a ponderosa pine forest stand to understand the effects of land use change on fire frequency, and the subsequent effects of fire decline on the forest structure.



Citation: White, Alan S. 1985. Presettlement regeneration patterns in a southwestern ponderosa pine stand. Ecology 66(2):589-594.

Summary:

The author analyzed the age structure and spatial distribution of an old-growth ponderosa pine stand to determine patterns of historic regeneration.