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 Ecosystem Effects

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Citation: Parks, Sean A.; Holsinger, Lisa M.; Miller, Carol L.; Nelson, Cara R. 2015. Wildland fire as a self-regulating mechanism: the role of previous burns and weather in limiting fire progression. Ecological Applications 25(6):1478-1492.

Summary:

The authors’ objective was to research the ability of wildfire to limit the spread of a subsequent fire based on the time between the two, and also to see how weather at the time of the fire alters this effect.



Citation: O'Connor, Christopher D.; Lynch, Ann M.; Falk, Donald A.; Swetnam, Thomas W. 2015. Post-fire forest dynamics and climate variability affect spatial and temporal properties of spruce beetle outbreaks on a Sky Island mountain range. Forest Ecology and Management 336:148-162.

Summary:

The authors reconstructed the species composition and structure of Engelmann spruce forest stand populations over a 319-year period between stand-replacing fire to determine how changes in the stand structure of spruce over time affect the size and severity of spruce beetle outbreaks.



Citation: Abella, Scott R.; Fornwalt, Paula J. 2015. Ten years of vegetation assembly after a North American mega-fire. Global Change Biology 21(2):789-802.

Summary:

This paper examines the post-fire recovery, resistance and resilience, of understory vegetation after a mega fire along a gradient of fire severities.



Citation: Shive, Kristen L.; Fulé, Peter Z.; Sieg, Carolyn Hull; Strom, Barbara A.; Hunter, Molly E. 2014. Managing burned landscapes: evaluating future management strategies for resilient forests under a warming climate. International Journal of Wildland Fire 23(7):915-928.

Summary:

Using the Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS), the authors examined the effects of projected climate scenarios on future forest trajectories of ponderosa pine ecosystems in the Rodeo-Chediski Fire, and they further examined the potential effects of management strategies, including prescribed fire, to mitigate climate effects and increase resilience.



Citation: O'Connor, Christopher D.; Falk, Donald A.; Lynch, Ann M.; Swetnam, Thomas W. 2014. Fire severity, size, and climate associations diverge from historical precedent along an ecological gradient in the Pinaleño Mountains, Arizona, USA. Forest Ecology and Management 329:264-278.

Summary:

The authors reconstructed the fire regime before and after fire exclusion around approximately 1880 to determine if recent large, high-severity fire is within the natural range of variability for Sky Island ecosystems in the Pinaleño Mountains of Arizona, U.S.



Citation: Tarancón, Alicia Azpeleta; Fulé, Peter Z.; Shive, Kristen L.; Sieg, Carolyn Hull; Sánchez Meador, Andrew; Strom, Barbara A. 2014. Simulating post-wildfire forest trajectories under alternative climate and management scenarios. Ecological Applications 24(7):1626-1637.

Summary:

The authors assessed potential future trajectories of forest stand structure in treated and untreated sites within the Rodeo-Chediski fire in response to multiple scenarios of climate change using the Climate-Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS).



Citation: Waltz, Amy E. M.; Stoddard, Michael T.; Kalies, Elizabeth L.; Springer, Judith D.; Huffman, David W.; Sánchez Meador, Andrew. 2014. Effectiveness of fuel reduction treatments: assessing metrics of forest resiliency and wildfire severity after the Wallow Fire, AZ. Forest Ecology and Management 334:43-52.

Summary:

The authors compared treated and untreated areas after the 2011 Wallow Fire to assess if fuel treatments reduced fire severity and increased ecological resiliency of mixed-conifer forests based on three metrics: high severity patch size, tree survivorship, and nonnative/native herbaceous understory cover post-fire.



Citation: Hoff, Valentijn; Teske, Casey C.; Riddering, James P.; Queen, Lloyd P.; Gdula, Eric G.; Bunn, Windy A. 2014. Changes in severity distribution after subsequent fires on the North Rim of Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, USA. Fire Ecology 10(2):48-63.

Summary:

The authors examined the effects of initial fire severity on subsequent fire severity and also how the pattern of burn severity patches is affected by initial burn conditions.



Citation: Parks, Sean A.; Miller, Carol L.; Nelson, Cara R.; Holden, Zachary A. 2014. Previous fires moderate burn severity of subsequent wildland fires in two large western US wilderness areas. Ecosystems 17(1):29-42.

Summary:

The authors examined fire-on-fire interactions in two wilderness areas to determine the extent to which a wildfire can influence the severity of a subsequent fire and, if so, how long does the effect last. They also looked at the influence of topography and vegetation on burn severity of reburned areas.



Citation: Haire, Sandra L.; McGarigal, Kevin; Miller, Carol. 2013. Wilderness shapes contemporary fire size distributions across landscapes of the western United States. Ecosphere 4(1):1-20.

Summary:

The authors modeled the effects of wilderness on the fire size distribution along forest gradients, while accounting for the effects of topography, weather, and climate.