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Displaying 51 - 60 of 110

Citation: Hessl, Amy E. 2011. Pathways for climate change effects on fire: models, data, and uncertainties. Progress in Physical Geography 35(3):393-407.

Summary:

This article reviews models and fire-history studies of climate change and fire and proposes three potential pathways of how climate may affect fire regimes.



Citation: Crimmins, Michael A. 2011. Interannual to decadal changes in extreme fire weather event frequencies across the southwestern United States. International Journal of Climatology 31(11):1573-1583.

Summary:

The authors examined the influence of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) on daily fire weather variability and extreme fire weather events.



Citation: Westerling, Anthony L.; Turner, Monica G.; Smithwick, Erica A.H.; Romme, William H.; Ryan, Michael G. 2011. Continued warming could transform Greater Yellowstone fire regimes by mid-21st Century. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 108(32):13165-13170.

Summary:

The authors projected how large fire (> 200 ha) occurrence, size, and spatial location may be affected by climate change in the forests of the Greater Yellowstone area.



Citation: Williams, A. Park; Allen, Craig D.; Millar, Constance I.; Swetnam, Thomas W.; Michaelsen, Joel; Still, Christopher J.; Leavitt, Steven W. 2010. Forest responses to increasing aridity and warmth in the southwestern United States. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science 107(50):21289-21294.

Summary:

The authors related tree-ring growth responses to the variability in precipitation, temperature, and relative humidity in southwestern forests and woodlands and projected trends in these relationships based on future climate change scenarios. They further analyzed trends in disturbance regimes, specifically wildfire and bark beetle outbreaks.



Citation: Allen, Craig D.; Macalady, Alison K.; Chenchouni, Haroun; Bachelet, Dominique; McDowell, Nate G.; Vennetier, Michel; Kitzberger, Thomas; Rigling, Andreas; Breshears, David D.; Hogg, Edward H.; Gonzalez, Patrick; Fensham, Roderick J.; Zhang, Zhen; Castro, Jorge; Demidova, Natalia; Lim, Jong-Hwan; Allard, Gillian; Running, Steven W.; Semerci, Akkin; Cobb, Neil S. 2010. A global overview of drought and heat-induced tree mortality reveals emerging climate change risks for forests. Forest Ecology and Management 259(4):660-684.

Summary:

This article was a review of literature regarding tree mortality due to water stress and increased temperatures as a result of climate change in forests around the world.



Citation: Yocom, Larissa L.; Fulé, Peter Z.; Brown, Peter M.; Cerano, Julián; Villanueva-Díaz, José; Falk, Donald A.; Cornejo-Oviedo, Eladio. 2010. El Nino-Southern Oscillation effect on a fire regime in northeastern Mexico has changed over time. Ecology 91(6):1660-1671.

Summary:

The authors characterized the historical fire regime of a Pinus hartwegii stand to determine the effects of climate, specifically ENSO, on regional fire occurrence.



Citation: Liu, Yongqiang; Stanturf, John A.; Goodrick, Scott L. 2010. Trends in global wildfire potential in a changing climate. Forest Ecology and Management 259(4):685-697.

Summary:

The authors simulated and projected global wildfire potential using the Keetch-Byram Drought Index (KBDI) as a proxy and future trends in fire activity under multiple climate change scenarios.



Citation: Pechony, O.; Shindell, D.T. 2010. Driving forces of global wildfires over the past millennium and the forthcoming century. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 107(45):19167-19170.

Summary:

The authors developed a model that estimates fire activity based on vegetation and climate/weather conditions as well as availability of ignition sources and fire suppression rates globally. The projected their model to determine how climate may affect future global fire trends.



Citation: Trouet, Valerie; Taylor, Alan H.; Wahl, Eugene R.; Skinner, Carl N. 2010. Fire-climate interactions in the American west since 1400 CE. Geophysical Research Letters 37(4):L04702. 5 p.

Summary:

The authors developed tree-ring based fire chronologies across four regions of the western U.S. from approximately 1400 CE to present to examine fire-climate relationships.



Citation: Iniguez, Jose M.; Swetnam, Thomas W.; Baisan, Christopher H. 2009. Spatially and temporally variable fire regime on Rincon Reak, Arizona, USA. Fire Ecology 5(1):3-21.

Summary: