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 In this study we investigate the use of ΔPM2.5/ΔCO and ΔNOy/ΔCO normalized enhancement ratios (NERs) in identifying wildfire (WF) smoke events in urban areas. Nine urban ambient monitoring sites with adequate CO, PM2.5, and/or NOy measurements were...

Person: Laing, Jaffe, Slavens, Li, Wang
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

In 2017, western Canadian wildfires injected smoke into the stratosphere that was detectable by satellites for more than 8 months. The smoke plume rose from 12 to 23 kilometers within 2 months owing to solar heating of black carbon, extending the...

Person: Yu, Toon, Bardeen, Zhu, Rosenlof, Portmann, Thornberry, Gao, Davis, Wolf, de Gouw, Peterson, Fromm, Robock
Year: 2019
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Epidemiologists use prediction models to downscale (i.e., interpolate) air pollution exposure where monitoring data is insufficient. This study compares machine learning prediction models for ground-level ozone during wildfires, evaluating the...

Person: Watson, Telesca, Reid, Pfister, Jerrett
Year: 2019
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildfires emit O3 precursors but there are large variations in emissions, plume heights, and photochemical processing. These factors make it challenging to model O3 production from wildfires using Eulerian models. Here we describe a statistical...

Person: Gong, Kaulfus, Nair, Jaffe
Year: 2017
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Asthma is the most common pediatric disease in the USA. It has been consistently demonstrated that asthma symptoms are exacerbated by exposure to ozone. Ozone (O3) is a secondary pollutant produced when volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are oxidized in...

Person: Pratt, Gan, Ford Hotmann, Brey, Pierce, Fischer, Magzamen
Year: 2019
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

A new statistical model for predicting daily ground level fine scale particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations at monitoring sites in the western United States was developed and tested operationally during the 2016 and 2017 wildfire seasons. The model...

Person: Marsha, Larkin
Year: 2019
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Using a WRF-SMOKE-CMAQ modeling framework, we investigate the impacts of smoke from prescribed fires on model performance, regional and loc al air quality, health impacts, and visibility in protected natural environments using three different...

Person: Ravi, Vaughan, Wolcott, Lamb
Year: 2019
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Short-term exposure to fire smoke, especially particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 µm (PM2.5), is associated with adverse health effects. In order to quantify the impact of prescribed burning on human health, a general health...

Person: Huang, Hu, Russell, Mulholland, Odman
Year: 2019
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Background: The public health community readily recognizes flooding and wildfires as climate-related health hazards, but few studies quantify changes in risk of exposure, particularly for vulnerable children and older adults. Objectives: This study...

Person: Mills, Jones, Wobus, Ekstrom, Jantarasami, St. Juliana, Crimmins
Year: 2018
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Large wildfires are an increasing threat to the western U.S. In the 2017 fire season, extensive wildfires occurred across the Pacific Northwest (PNW). To evaluate public health impacts of wildfire smoke, we integrated numerical simulations and...

Person: Zou, O'Neill, Larkin, Alvarado, Solomon, Mass, Liu, Odman, Shen
Year: 2019
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES