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Forest fires contribute to climate change mainly due to emission of greenhouse gases by biomass burning and loss of sequestration by sink destruction. The average contribution in Spain between 1998 and 2015 was 9,494,910 Mg CO2 eq per year, 23.8% from...

Person: Enríquez-de-Salamanca
Year: 2020
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fine particulate matter emissions (PM2.5) from landscape biomass fires, both prescribed and wild, pose a significant public health risk, with smoke exposure seasonally impacting human populations through both highly concentrated local plumes, and more...

Person: Williamson, Lucani
Year: 2020
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Maintaining appropriate fire return intervals for fully functioning ecosystems can be difficult for a variety of reasons. Laws and regulations can place limitations on both the timing and extent of prescribed burning. In this webinar, Dr. Wonkka will...

Person: Wonkka
Year: 2020
Type: Media
Source: FRAMES

Modelling and forecasting of air pollution from bushfires or hazardous reduction burnings is important in providing information and allowing measures to be taken to reduce the exposure of people from harmful effect of air pollutants from fire events....

Person: Duc, Trieu, Cope, Azzi, Morgan
Year: 2020
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Smoke exposure from bushfires, such as those experienced in Australia during 2019-2020, can reach levels up to 10 times those deemed hazardous. Short‐term and extended exposure to high levels of air pollution can be associated with adverse health...

Person: Walter, Schneider-Futschik, Knibbs, Irving
Year: 2020
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Previous estimates of greenhouse gas emissions from Australian savanna fires have incorporated on-ground dead wood but ignored standing dead trees. However, research from eucalypt woodlands in southern Queensland has shown that the two pools of dead...

Person: Cook, Liedloff, Meyer, Richards, Bray
Year: 2020
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

THE FIRE AND SMOKE MODEL EVALUATION EXPERIMENT (FASMEE) is a multi-agency effort to provide advanced measurements necessary to evaluate and advance operationally-used fire and smoke modeling systems and their underlying scientific models. The field...

Person: Brown
Year: 2020
Type: Media
Source: FRAMES

Widespread and persistent summer multi-day episodes of dense wildfire smoke affected western Canada in 2017 and 2018. These events often occurred under otherwise clear-sky, anticyclonic weather conditions and can have significant impacts on surface...

Person: Ferrara, Pomeroy, McKendry, Stull, Strawbridge
Year: 2020
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

With increasing heat and droughts world-wide, wildfires are becoming a more serious global threat to the world’s population. Wildfire smoke is composed of approximately 80% to 90% of fine (<2.5 um) and ultrafine (<1 um) particulate matter (PM)...

Person: Prunicki, Dant, Cao, Maecker, Haddad, Kim, Snyder, Wu, Nadeau
Year: 2020
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildfires strongly regulate carbon (C) cycling and storage in boreal forests and account for almost 10% of global fire C emissions. However, the anticipated effects of climate change on fire regimes may destabilize current C-climate feedbacks and...

Person: Ribeiro-Kumara, Köster, Aaltonen, Köster
Year: 2020
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES