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Displaying 1 - 10 of 114

Estimates of greenhouse gases and particulate emissions are made with a high spatiotemporal resolution from the Kilmore East fire in Victoria, Australia, which burnt approximately 100,000 ha over a 12 h period. Altogether, 10,175 Gigagrams (Gg) of CO2...

Person: Surawski, Sullivan, Roxburgh, Polglase
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

In Northern Thailand, wildland fire during cold period releases large amounts of smoke and fine particles into the atmosphere. The fine particles include several persistent organic compounds such as PAHs. In this study, PM2.5-bound PAH concentrations...

Person: Pongpiachan
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

PM2.5 inventories have been developed in major Chinese cities to quantify the contributions from various sources based on annual emissions. This approach, however, could substantially underestimate the contribution from open straw burning during the...

Person: Zhang, Liu, Hao
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Peat fires in Southeast Asia have become a major annual source of trace gases and particles to the regional–global atmosphere. The assessment of their influence on atmospheric chemistry, climate, air quality, and health has been uncertain partly due to...

Person: Stockwell, Jayarathne, Cochrane, Ryan, Putra, Saharjo, Nurhayati, Albar, Blake, Simpson, Stone, Yokelson
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES

Connections between wildfires and modes of variability in climate are sought as a means for predicting fire activity on interannual to multi-decadal timescales. Several fire drivers, such as temperature and local drought index, have been shown to vary...

Person: Ward, Shevliakova, Malyshev, Lamarque, Wittenberg
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

The 2011 Richardson wildland mega-fire in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR) in northern Alberta, Canada had large effects on air quality. At a receptor site in the center of the AOSR ambient PM2.5, O3, NO, NO2, SO2, NH3, HONO, HNO3, NH4+ and NO3-...

Person: Bytnerowicz, Hsu, Percy, Legge, Fenn, Schilling, Fraczek, Alexander
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Landscape fires can produce large quantities of smoke that degrade air quality in both remote and urban communities. Smoke from these fires is a complex mixture of fine particulate matter and gases, exposure to which is associated with increased...

Person: Barn, Elliott, Allen, Kosatsky, Rideout, Henderson
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Vegetation, wildfire and atmospheric oxygen on Earth have changed throughout geological times, and are dependent on each other, determining the evolution of ecosystems, the carbon cycle, and the climate, as found in the fossil record. Previous work in...

Person: Huang, Rein
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Introduction: Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions from vegetation fires can be transported over long distances and may cause significant air pollution episodes far from the fires. However, epidemiological evidence on health effects of vegetation-...

Person: Kollanus, Tiittanen, Niemi, Lanki
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Plant-derived smoke promotes germination in Mediterranean-like environments, but its effect is unclear in the Mediterranean Cistaceae. This article investigates the role of smoke in the comparative germination ecology of five Helianthemum taxa....

Person: Martinez-Baniela, Carlon, Diaz, Bueno, Fernandez-Pascual
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: TTRS