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Landscape fires can produce large quantities of smoke that degrade air quality in both remote and urban communities. Smoke from these fires is a complex mixture of fine particulate matter and gases, exposure to which is associated with increased...

Person: Barn, Elliott, Allen, Kosatsky, Rideout, Henderson
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) generated by forest fires has been associated with a wide range of adverse health outcomes, including exacerbation of respiratory diseases and increased risk of mortality. Due to the unpredictable nature of forest fires...

Person: Yuchi, Yao, Mclean, Stull, Paviovic, Davignon, Moran, Henderson
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Environment and Climate Change Canada's FireWork air quality (AQ) forecast system for North America with near-real-time biomass burning emissions has been running experimentally during the Canadian wildfire season since 2013. The system runs twice...

Person: Pavlovic, Chen, Anderson, Moran, Beaulieu, Davignon, Cousineau
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildfire can impose a direct impact on human health under climate change. While the potential impacts of climate change on wildfires and resulting air pollution have been studied, it is not known who will be most affected by the growing threat of...

Person: Liu, Mickley, Sulprizio, Dominici, Yue, Ebisu, Anderson, Khan, Bravo, Bell
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Exposure to forest fire smoke (FFS) is associated with multiple adverse health effects, mostly respiratory. Findings for cardiovascular effects have been inconsistent, possibly related to the limitations of conventional methods to assess FFS exposure....

Person: Yao, Eyamie, Henderson
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Highly buoyant plumes, such as wildfire plumes, in low to moderate wind speeds have initial trajectories that are steeper than many industrial waste plumes. They will rise further into the atmosphere before bending significantly. In such cases the...

Person: Tohidi, Kaye
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

1. Fire can affect bees directly through exposure to heat and smoke. Direct effects include mortality, injury, and displacement affecting at most two generations adults and any immature progeny present during the fire. To study the direct effects of...

Person: Love, Cane
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Non-deforestation fire - i.e., fire that is typically followed by the recovery of natural vegetation - is arguably the most influential disturbance in terrestrial ecosystems, thereby playing a major role in carbon exchanges and affecting many climatic...

Person: Landry, Matthews
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Two specific fires from 2011 are tracked for local to regional scale contribution to ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) using a freely available regulatory modeling system that includes the BlueSky wildland fire emissions tool, Spare Matrix...

Person: Baker, Woody, Tonnesen, Hutzell, Pye, Beaver, Pouliot, Pierce
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Humans use combustion for heating and cooking, managing lands, and, more recently, for fuelling the industrial economy. As a shift to fossil-fuel-based energy occurs, we expect that anthropogenic biomass burning in open landscapes will decline as it...

Person: Balch, Nagy, Archibald, Bowman, Moritz, Roos, Scott, Williamson
Year: 2016
Type: Document
Source: TTRS