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The once widespread Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris)-dominated ecosystems of the southeastern coastal plain of the United States have been greatly reduced in extent, and many of the remaining stands are being degraded by hardwood invasion due to fire...

Person: Condon, Putz
Year: 2007
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text (pp.6-7) ... 'Another [reason periodic low-intensity fires have ceased to provide forest and land maintenance] is the culture of fire suppression in America deliberately created in the early 20th century to promote a shift to...

Person: Robertson
Year: 2007
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Recreation is of increasing importance in forest environments. Fire has both short-term effects, trail closures, smoke impacts; and long-term effects, residual 'scars,' potential hazards, on forest recreation. The general public is gaining...

Person: Krammes, Taylor
Year: 1990
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

The public outcry about the 1988 fires in Yellowstone National Park and adjacent natural forests, coupled with concern among natural resource managers, convinced the Secretaries of the Departments of Interior and Agriculture to establish the Fire...

Person: Wakimoto
Year: 1990
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Wilson, Mueller
Year: 1990
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire is becoming recognized as a major issue throughout the North American continent. The last several years have seen major fire seasons in the United States, Canada, and Mexico. There are five areas where an international approach to fire management...

Person: Barkow
Year: 1990
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Mutch
Year: 1990
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

The Manual includes information on the organization's standard operating procedures, requirements, and guidelines regarding fire management. It also outlines the necessary steps for developing and maintaining a succesful fire management program....

Person: Seamon
Year: 2007
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire scientists in the United States began exploring the relationships of fire-danger and hazard with weather, fuel moisture, and ignition probabilities as early as 1916. Many of the relationships identified then persist today in the form of our...

Person: Hardy, Hardy
Year: 2007
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS