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High temporal resolution information on burnt area is needed to improve fire behaviour and emissions models. We used the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) thermal anomaly and active fire product (MO(Y)D14) as input to a kriging...

Person: Veraverbeke, Sedano, Hook, Randerson, Jin, Rogers
Year: 2014
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Smoke from biomass fires makes up a substantial portion of global greenhouse gas, aerosol, and black carbon (GHG/A/BC) emissions. Understanding how fuel characteristics and conditions affect fire occurrence and extent, combustion dynamics, and fuel...

Person: Weise, Wright
Year: 2014
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

While the vast majority of carbon emitted by wildland fires is released as CO2, CO, and CH4, wildland fire smoke is nonetheless a rich and complex mixture of gases and aerosols. Primary emissions include significant amounts of CH4 and aerosol (organic...

Person: Urbanski
Year: 2014
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Fuel consumption specifies the amount of vegetative biomass consumed during wildland fire. It is a two-stage process of pyrolysis and combustion that occurs simultaneously and at different rates depending on the characteristics and condition of the...

Person: Ottmar
Year: 2014
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Evaluating the influence of observed daily weather on observed fire-related effects (e.g. smoke production, carbon emissions and burn severity) often involves knowing exactly what day any given area has burned. As such, several studies have used fire...

Person: Parks
Year: 2014
Type: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Fires in croplands, plantations, and rangelands contribute significantly to fire emissions in the United States, yet are often overshadowed by wildland fires in efforts to develop inventories or estimate responses to climate change. Here we quantified...

Person: Lin, McCarty, Wang, Rogers, Morton, Collatz, Jin, Randerson
Year: 2014
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Increasing wildfire activity in recent decades, partially related to extended droughts, along with concern over potential impacts of future climate change on fire activity has resulted in increased attention on fire-climate interactions. Findings from...

Person: Liu, Goodrick, Heilman
Year: 2014
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildfires are an important component of the terrestrial carbon cycle and one of the main pathways for movement of carbon from the land surface to the atmosphere. Fires have received much attention in recent years as potential catalysts for shifting...

Person: Loehman, Reinhardt, Riley
Year: 2014
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Emissions from wildland fire are both highly variable and highly uncertain over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. Wildland fire emissions change considerably due to fluctuations from year to year with overall fire season severity, from...

Person: Larkin, Raffuse, Strand
Year: 2014
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Biomass burning is a major source of greenhouse gases, aerosols, black carbon, and atmospheric pollutants that affects regional and global climate and air quality. The spatial and temporal extent of fires and the size of burned areas are critical...

Person: Hao, Larkin
Year: 2014
Type: Document
Source: TTRS