Catalog

Year

Displaying 1 - 10 of 61

A 2005 biomass burning (wildfire, prescribed, and agricultural) emission inventory has been developed for the contiguous United States using a newly developed simplified method of combining information from multiple sources for use in the US EPA's...

Person: Pouliot, Pace, Roy, Pierce, Mobley
Year: 2008
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Direct evidence of the effects of intense wildfire on forest soil is rare because reliable prefire data are lacking. By chance, an established large-scale experiment was partially burned in the 2002 Biscuit fire in southwestern Oregon. About 200 grid...

Person: Bormann, Homann, Darbyshire, Morrissette
Year: 2008
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Biomass burning is a major source of aerosols that affect air quality and the Earth's radiation budget. Current estimates of biomass burning emissions vary markedly due to uncertainties in biomass density, combustion efficiency, emission factor,...

Person: Zhang, Kondragunta, Schmidt, Kogan
Year: 2008
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Biomass burning is an important primary source of particles containing biomarker compounds, which are introduced into smoke primarily by direct volatilization/steam stripping and by thermal alteration based on combustion conditions. This study presents...

Person: Medeiros, Simoneit
Year: 2008
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Historic and current use pesticides (HUPs and CUPS), with respect to use in the United States and Canada, were identified in trans-Pacific and regional air masses at Mt Bachelor Observatory (MBO), a remote high elevation mountain in Oregon's...

Person: Primbs, Wilson, Schmedding, Higginbotham, Simonich
Year: 2008
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Atmospheric measurements of semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) were made at Mt. Bachelor Observatory (MBO), located in Oregon's Cascade Range, to understand the trans-Pacific and regional transport of SOCs from urban areas. High volume air...

Person: Primbs, Piekarz, Wilson, Schmedding, Higginbotham, Field, Simonich
Year: 2008
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Forest fires remain a devastating phenomenon in the tropics that not only affect forest structure and biodiversity, but also contribute significantly to atmospheric CO2. Fire used to be extremely rare in tropical forests, leaving ample time for forests...

Person: Slik, Bernard, van Beek, Breman, Eichhorn
Year: 2008
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Aerosols from wildfires are the primary aerosols in the Arctic atmosphere during the summer months. These aerosols occur in large, increasing quantities and impact the sensitive radiative balance in the Arctic. FROSTFIRE, a controlled burn in a Long-...

Person: Cahill, Cahill, Perry
Year: 2008
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Emissions of polychlorinated dibenzodioxin and polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDD/F) from simulated grassland and forest fires were quantitatively sampled to derive emission factors in support of PCDD/F inventory development. Grasses from Kentucky and...

Person: Gullett, Touati, Oudejans
Year: 2008
Type: Document
Source: TTRS

Plume dispersion models may improve assessment of the health effects associated with forest fire smoke, but they require considerable expertise in atmospheric and fire sciences to initialize and evaluate. Products from MODIS (Moderate Resolution...

Person: Henderson, Burkholder, Jackson, Brauer, Ichoku
Year: 2008
Type: Document
Source: TTRS